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Given a piece java code:

class SampleExpcetion {
  public static void main(String args[]){
        try {
                 int a[]= new int[15];
                 a[5]= 30/0;
         } 
         catch(Exception e) {System.out.println("task completed");}  
         catch(ArithmeticException e) {System.out.println("task1 completed");}  
         catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e) { System.out.println("task2 completed");}

         System.out.println("Rest of the code......");
   }
}  

Why this piece of code will give compile-time error?

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2  
Which error ? I suspect that the compiler detects the division by zero. –  X.L.Ant Feb 6 '13 at 8:20
    
Why are you doing this? a[5]= 30/0 ? –  Simz Feb 6 '13 at 8:20
    
A quick note consolidating the answers below, when catching exceptions always be sure to move from the most specific (ArrayIndexBoundsException, etc..) to the most generic (Exception). Doing it the other way (as you are doing it) will cause the first catch to catch everything. –  npinti Feb 6 '13 at 8:26

5 Answers 5

The first catch block catches all exceptions, so the others can never be reached.

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Thanx! got it now. –  Vibha pandey Feb 6 '13 at 10:24

Because catch(Exception e) {System.out.println("task completed");} would catch all exceptions.

 catch(ArithmeticException e) {System.out.println("task1 completed");}  
 catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e) { System.out.println("task2 completed");}

is a dead code.

Reorder like this or even better eliminate : catch(Exception e)

  catch(ArithmeticException e) {System.out.println("task1 completed");}  
  catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e) { System.out.println("task2 completed");}
  catch(Exception e) {System.out.println("task completed");}  
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thanx, got the problem now. –  Vibha pandey Feb 6 '13 at 10:26

The compiler sees that catching an ArithmeticException after its superclass is not possible; the first catch clause will always match.

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In a try catch block all the subsequent catch blocks shouldn't have any subclass exception in catch block. That would lead to dead code.

Also to add, in SE 7 you can specify all the types of exception that you want to check, something like:

catch (IOException|SQLException ex) {
    //...
}

Are you trying to understand what is NullPointerException ?

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thanx for answering, got it now. –  Vibha pandey Feb 6 '13 at 10:28
    
@Vibhapandey Welcome, and yes, don't forget to accept the answer which worked for you ! –  dShringi Feb 6 '13 at 10:40

Because "Exception e" is capable of catching all the exception objects,hence other catch blocks will not be reached.This is known as "unreachable code". Unreachable code is an error in Java language.

For eg:-If Clothes is an exception class and has subclasses->Shirt and Trouser. If an exception of Shirt class has occured but we are catching that with Clothes before Shirt,then it will not reach ever to next catch block with Shirt Exception as it has been handled. This leads to the next catch block to be unreachable.

Hope it helps!!!

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