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Currently, PHP supports two naming conventions for constructors. PHP 4 supported Java-style constructors:

class A
{
    public function A()
    {
        echo "I'm a constructor for class A!";
    }
}

PHP 5 supports both the Java-style constructors and a "magic method" syntax:

class A
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        echo "I'm a constructor for class A!";
    }
}

The Java-style syntax is slated for deprecation, and some features of it don't work in the latest PHP. However, it has an interesting property that I know of no analogue for with the "magic method" syntax. If derived class foobar has no explicit constructor, then the foobar method of the base class becomes the foobar constructor:

class A
{
    public function A()
    {
        echo "I'm a constructor for class A!";
    }

    public function B()
    {
        echo "I'm a constructor for class B!";
    }
}

class B extends A
{
}

Since Java-style constructors are being deprecated, what will become of the set-the-constructor-in-the-parent language feature?

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6  
First, the fact that the inherited B method acts as the constructor is probably more of an unforeseen side-effect of how classes were originally implemented, than a feature. Second, when the Java-style constructors become fully deprecated they will simply stop working. I am not giving this as an answer because I feel your question answers itself. –  Sverri M. Olsen Feb 6 '13 at 8:42
1  
Looks like more of a bug (PHP looking for a constructor after it logically implemented the extension during the compilation process). As a matter of fact, I preferred the Java-style constructor... (without the bugs) –  ring0 Feb 6 '13 at 8:47
    
This is not a bug, in fact it is an explicit feature of PHP that is mentioned somewhere in the fine manual. I'll try to dig it up. –  dotancohen Feb 6 '13 at 11:11
3  
Feature? Why on earth would anyone want to do this? If you know that there will be a class named B deriving from you then why not place the constructor in B itself? In any case, you can achieve the same effect by implementing __construct in the parent and using get_called_class() to determine what's being instantiated. But ugh! –  Jon Feb 6 '13 at 14:03
1  
Can you give a use-case for defining the constructor in the parent? I can't really see it being a useful feature. If I really want to construct B using the B() method in class A, I can always write the constructor for B to cal parent::B(). I can't see a case where I'd want it to magically pick B() as the constructor. In fact, I can see cases where it might cause real confusion. –  SDC Feb 6 '13 at 14:04
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You probably learned this here, for PHP 4.

As you already know, in PHP 5 documentation (here) it is stated that if no __construct() is used or inherited, the old syntax kicks in as a fallback:

For backwards compatibility, if PHP 5 cannot find a __construct() function for a given class, and the class did not inherit one from a parent class, it will search for the old-style constructor function, by the name of the class. Effectively, it means that the only case that would have compatibility issues is if the class had a method named __construct() which was used for different semantics.

So the old syntax should still be valid, as PHP 5.4.11. There is no explicit plan for deprecation, right now, even if it's foreseeable.

Anyway, when (and if) they will be dropped, this feature will be dropped too as there is no way to reproduce it with the __construct() syntax.

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1  
Regarding the 5.3.3 version: that's when back-compat constructors stopped working for namespaced classes. The existing answer is a bit unclear on what the significance of 5.3.3 is. –  Jon Feb 6 '13 at 14:08
    
You're right, the current stable PHP version is 5.4.11. Let me fix it. –  St0rM Feb 6 '13 at 14:57
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What PHP installation are you working now ?

If you have a PHP 5 installation:

If you are making new classes, use the new style. If you already have classes with the previous style, they still work, but, it good that you update them, when you can.

If you have a PHP 4 installation:

Yopu have to use the previous style. If you change to PHP 5 later, they also work.

Cheers.

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This answer has nothing to do with the question asked. –  dotancohen Feb 7 '13 at 7:49
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