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Does anyone know of any formula for converting a light frequency to an RGB value?

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6  
Cool question. +1. –  Drew Noakes Sep 24 '09 at 15:45
1  
Very technical questions in terms of physics and programming +1. –  whatnick Sep 24 '09 at 15:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Here's a detailed explanation of the entire conversion process: http://www.fourmilab.ch/documents/specrend/. Source code included!

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1  
Yay! Fourmilab! –  erickson Sep 24 '09 at 16:00
    
And the Fourmilab article makes the important point that some colours are not representable in RGB (bright oranges being a good example) because you cannot "make" arbitrary colours of light by adding three primary colours together, whatever our physics teachers may have told us (well mine did). Too bad, but in practice not usually fatal. –  Francis Davey May 29 '10 at 22:58
    
In addition to it: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Srgb The article was written before sRGB standard was widely adopted. Also note the "Calculations assume the 2° standard colorimetric observer" phrase, which means CIE 1931 table found in accompanying source to the paper should be used and not CIE 1964. –  GrayFace Feb 10 at 7:45
    
It would be nice to provide some example how to use the code. It requires function as an argument, uses temperature to calculate colors and such things. One would be happy to know what to delete and change to get it to work. –  Tomáš Zato Mar 13 at 16:34

You're talking about converting from wave length to an RGB value.

Look here, will probably answer your question. Thy have an utility for doing this with the source code as well as some explanation.

WaveLengthToRGB

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1  
Just reading the same page "There is no unique one-to-one mapping between wavelength and RGB values" - so well you are stuck with a lookup table and heuristics. As a first cut I would look at HSV to RGB conversions since the "Hue" ranges from blue to red. With possibly a slight shift since in RGB domain red+blue = violet and violet has the shortest visible wavelength. –  whatnick Sep 24 '09 at 15:49
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isn't it practically the same? freq = c / wavelength –  Mauricio Scheffer Sep 24 '09 at 15:56
    
@Mauricio Scheffer Yes it is EXACTLY the same. –  Joseph Gordon Jul 1 '10 at 19:55
    
this Bruton's algorithm is rather aesthetic than realistic –  mykhal Sep 15 '10 at 19:01
5  
@ Joseph Gordon - Strongly disagree. Consider a greenish ray 400nm emitted in air hit the water surface and then propagates in water. Refraction coefficient of water is, say, 1.33, so a ray wavelength in water is now 300nm, which obviously doesn't change it's color. The matter that "colorizes" the rays is frequency, not wavelength. In the same substance (vacuum, air, water) frequencies (colors) map to same wavelengths. In different media - not. –  mbaitoff Jan 16 '11 at 7:44

I guess I might as well follow up my comment with a formal answer. The best option is to use the HSV colour space - though the hue represents the wavelength it is not a one-to-one comparison.

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For lazy guys (like me), here is an implementation in java of the code found in @user151323 's answer (that is, just a simple translation from pascal code found in Spectra Lab Report):

static private double Gamma = 0.80;
static private double IntensityMax = 255;

/** Taken from Earl F. Glynn's web page:
* <a href="http://www.efg2.com/Lab/ScienceAndEngineering/Spectra.htm">Spectra Lab Report</a>
* */
public static int[] waveLengthToRGB(double Wavelength){
    double factor;
    double Red,Green,Blue;

    if((Wavelength >= 380) && (Wavelength<440)){
        Red = -(Wavelength - 440) / (440 - 380);
        Green = 0.0;
        Blue = 1.0;
    }else if((Wavelength >= 440) && (Wavelength<490)){
        Red = 0.0;
        Green = (Wavelength - 440) / (490 - 440);
        Blue = 1.0;
    }else if((Wavelength >= 490) && (Wavelength<510)){
        Red = 0.0;
        Green = 1.0;
        Blue = -(Wavelength - 510) / (510 - 490);
    }else if((Wavelength >= 510) && (Wavelength<580)){
        Red = (Wavelength - 510) / (580 - 510);
        Green = 1.0;
        Blue = 0.0;
    }else if((Wavelength >= 580) && (Wavelength<645)){
        Red = 1.0;
        Green = -(Wavelength - 645) / (645 - 580);
        Blue = 0.0;
    }else if((Wavelength >= 645) && (Wavelength<781)){
        Red = 1.0;
        Green = 0.0;
        Blue = 0.0;
    }else{
        Red = 0.0;
        Green = 0.0;
        Blue = 0.0;
    };

    // Let the intensity fall off near the vision limits

    if((Wavelength >= 380) && (Wavelength<420)){
        factor = 0.3 + 0.7*(Wavelength - 380) / (420 - 380);
    }else if((Wavelength >= 420) && (Wavelength<701)){
        factor = 1.0;
    }else if((Wavelength >= 701) && (Wavelength<781)){
        factor = 0.3 + 0.7*(780 - Wavelength) / (780 - 700);
    }else{
        factor = 0.0;
    };


    int[] rgb = new int[3];

    // Don't want 0^x = 1 for x <> 0
    rgb[0] = Red==0.0 ? 0 : (int) Math.round(IntensityMax * Math.pow(Red * factor, Gamma));
    rgb[1] = Green==0.0 ? 0 : (int) Math.round(IntensityMax * Math.pow(Green * factor, Gamma));
    rgb[2] = Blue==0.0 ? 0 : (int) Math.round(IntensityMax * Math.pow(Blue * factor, Gamma));

    return rgb;
}

By the way, this works fine for me.

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There seems to be a bug in your code. If the wavelength is for example 439.5, your function returns black. The original code on the site was working with integers, I believe (I don't know pascal at all). I suggest to change Wavelength<=439 to Wavelength<440. –  Hassedev Feb 25 '13 at 15:44
    
You're right! Thank you for pointing this out to me :) Already corrected. –  Tarc Mar 2 '13 at 20:30

I did a linear fit of known hue values and frequencies (dropping out red and violet because they extend so far in frequency values that they skew things a bit) and I got a rough conversion equation.

It goes like
frequency (in THz)=474+(3/4)(Hue Angle (in degrees))

I've tried to look around and see if anyone has come up with this equation, but I haven't found anything as of May 2010.

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