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I have created a function which return NUMBER type in a package, but not declare this function in the Package Specification.

I am calling this function in SQL query in anther function with in same package body. I am getting error.

When i declare function in Package Specification Then its fine & working.

I want to know reason behind it. Please anybody explain it.

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Could you show your functions? –  Plouf Feb 6 '13 at 13:39
    
Sorry, but this question does not show much research effort and is unclear. -1 for this. –  Rachcha Feb 7 '13 at 15:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Nothing to do with forward declaration at all.

This deals with the fact that you are using a SQL query to call the function. It seems like when using a statement to invoke a function, you are no longer inside the scope of the PL/SQL package, thus you can only call publicly available functions.

As for the why, I can only guess, so don't take it as granted, but PL/SQL and SQL have different engines. So, when doing a sql query, even inside your pl/sql package, you go to the level of SQL where it'll check again the permissions according to the SQL engine. So it has no idea it is executed from within a PL/SQL package and you should be allowed to call the private function.

I think the difference of engines can be checked easily, try to use a varchar2 of 32000, it'll work within your pl/sql function. Now, if you call your pl/sql function returning a varchar2(32000), it'll fail. Thi is a problem I ran into, but I don't have any databse to give you a snippet.

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It seems I misread the OP's question - I thought the calling sequence was SQL -> function2 -> function1, whereas he/she probably meant function2 -> SQL -> function1. In this case, you're right, of course. –  Frank Schmitt Feb 7 '13 at 12:02

You can use functions that are declared only in the package body, but you have to declare them before they are first used:

create or replace package pkg_so is

  function get2 return number;

end pkg_so;
/
create or replace package body pkg_so is

  function get1 return number is
  begin
    return 1;
  end;

  function get2 return number is
  begin
    return get1 + 1;
  end;

end pkg_so;
/
select pkg_so.get2 from dual
/
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yeah this is called forward declaration.If any procedure/function is not declare in package sepcificarion. Then it must be first declare in body before the first used in body.

create or replace package pkg_so is

  function get2 return number;

end pkg_so;
/
create or replace package body pkg_so is

  function get1 return number is
  begin
    return 1;
  end;

  function get2 return number is
  begin
    return get1 + 1;
  end;

end pkg_so;
/
select pkg_so.get2 from dual
/
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for copying my answer 1:1 –  Frank Schmitt Feb 7 '13 at 12:03

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