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This has been bugging me for a whole day. I need to send emails to different person, some emails may have multiple recipients, and some recipient receives multiple emails.

So suppose I have a dictionary like this:

{
    'email4': ['msg1', 'msg4', 'msg5'], 
    'email2': ['msg1', 'msg3'], 
    'email3': ['msg1', 'msg2', 'msg4'], 
    'email1': ['msg1', 'msg2', 'msg3']
}

And I want to produce something like:

{
    'email1, email2, email3, email4': ['msg1'],
    'email1, email3': ['msg2'],
    'email1, email2': ['msg3'],
    'email3, email4': ['msg4'],
    'email4': ['msg5']
}

I figured it would be a multiple intersection on both keys and values of the dictionary sort of thing, anyway, you get the idea.

Quick question, how do I do this in python.

Thanks for any help, have a nice day.

Update

  1. why use email(s) as keys Let's say I'm gonna send email to email address 4, instead of sending msg1, msg4, and msg5 in separate emails, I want to combine them into 1 email.
  2. Tuple keys It's just a demonstration, I of course can use tuples, but how's that gonna solve my problem?

Thanks all

share|improve this question
3  
Are you sure you want a comma-delimited string as your dictionary key instead of a tuple? –  Tim Pietzcker Feb 6 '13 at 9:50
1  
i did't understood your logic. put clarification here and you code. –  Zagorulkin Dmitry Feb 6 '13 at 9:52

3 Answers 3

Example using defaultdict of sets as intermediate data structure:

#!/usr/bin/env python
# encoding: utf-8

from collections import defaultdict
from pprint import pprint

messages = { 
    'email4': ['msg1', 'msg4', 'msg5'],
    'email2': ['msg1', 'msg3'],
    'email3': ['msg1', 'msg2', 'msg4'],
    'email1': ['msg1', 'msg2', 'msg3']
}

intermediate = defaultdict(set)

for email, msgs in messages.items():
    for msg in msgs:
        intermediate[msg].add(email)

inverted = {tuple(v): k for k, v in intermediate.items()}
pprint(inverted)

# {('email2', 'email1'): 'msg3',
#  ('email3', 'email1'): 'msg2',
#  ('email4',): 'msg5',
#  ('email4', 'email2', 'email3', 'email1'): 'msg1',
#  ('email4', 'email3'): 'msg4'}
share|improve this answer

First suggestions: index on messages and key to list of recipients, easy to work with:

from collections import defaultdict
from pprint import pprint

data = {
    'email4': ['msg1', 'msg4', 'msg5'], 
    'email2': ['msg1', 'msg3'], 
    'email3': ['msg1', 'msg2', 'msg4'], 
    'email1': ['msg1', 'msg2', 'msg3']
}

result = defaultdict(list)

for addr, msgs in data.iteritems():
    for msg in msgs:
        result[msg].append(addr)

pprint(result)

If all you want is to combine the messages:

for addr, msgs in data.iteritems():
    data[addr] = '\n'.join(msgs)

print data
share|improve this answer

You first need to make a dictionnary that is the "reverse" of the one you have now : one where keys are the messages and values the recipients :

{
    'msg1': ['email1', 'email2', 'email3', 'email4'],
    'msg2': ['email1', 'email3'],
    ...

To do so, you just have to go through your dictionnary once.

Once you have this second dictionnary, solving your problem is rather straightforward.

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