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I've written some code which monitors the running windows processes. I wish to know when a certain process starts and when it ends. The code works just like I want it to.

Now, I wish to implement it in a windows form server application - so it will run in loop as long as the form is alive. I guess I should make it run asynchronously maybe using a BackgroundWorker. I'm just not sure what's the best way to do it and how.

Here is my monitor code:

using System;
using System.Management;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;

class ProcessMonitor
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Dictionary<string, Process> newProcs= new Dictionary<string, Process> ();
        while (true) 
        {
            foreach (Process process in Process.GetProcesses())
            {
                if (process.ProcessName.CompareTo("Someprocess") == 0)
                {
                    if (!searchForProcess(newProcs, process.Id))
                    {
                        ManagementObjectSearcher searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher("SELECT CommandLine FROM Win32_Process WHERE ProcessId = " + process.Id);
                        foreach (ManagementObject @object in searcher.Get())
                        {
                            Console.Write("Adding new Process: ");
                            Console.WriteLine(@object["CommandLine"] + " ");
                            newProcs.Add(@object["CommandLine"] + " ", process);
                        }   
                    }
                }
            }
            checkProcesses(newProcs);
        } 
        Console.WriteLine("Done");
    }

    private static bool searchForProcess(Dictionary<string, Process> newProcs, int newKey)
    {
        foreach (Process process in newProcs.Values)
        {
            if (process.Id == newKey)
                return true;
        }

        return false;
    }
    private static void checkProcesses(Dictionary<string, Process> newProcs)
    {
        foreach (string currProc in newProcs.Keys)
        {
            bool processExists = false;
            foreach (Process process in Process.GetProcesses())
            {
                if (process.Id == newProcs[currProc].Id)
                {
                    processExists = true;
                    break;
                }

            }
            if (!processExists)
            {
                Console.Write("Process Finished: ");
                Console.WriteLine(currProc);
                newProcs.Remove(currProc);
                if (newProcs.Count == 0)
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
}

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean with "windows form server application"? –  SoMoS Feb 6 '13 at 10:20
    
You could use a timer. Do you have any spec for how it should work? –  Jocke Feb 6 '13 at 10:25
    
My server side is a windows form application, not a console application. Basically, my client sends command requests to the server, and the server runs them. I wish to track those commands, and send the client a notification when each of them finish. –  Idanis Feb 6 '13 at 11:57

3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

u can create a method like this

 public static void Thread1() {
           //paste your main code hear
            }

copy and past all your code, written in the main to this new method.

change the main to some like this

 public static void Main() {
            Console.WriteLine("Before start thread");
            Thread tid1 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(Thread1 ) );
            tid1.Start();                
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I did that on ther server. The problem now is that if I use tid1.Start(); then for some reason, the form doesn't shutdown when I click the "x" button to close it..Any ideas? –  Idanis Feb 6 '13 at 13:02
    
on the form closing event you have to call 'tid1.Stop();' –  Mohsen Heydari Feb 7 '13 at 6:13

Can achieve using Subscription / Polling .

Polling techniques for Process loop,

  • BackgroundWorker

    if you have a single task that runs in the background and needs to interact with the UI.

  • ThreadPool thread

    When efficiency is desired. It avoid the overhead associated with creating, starting, and stopping threads. Not for long running tasks.

  • Thread class

    For long-running tasks and when you require fine-grained control over thread execution,etc.

Subscripton ,

 ManagementEventWatcher (what stuart mentioned)

Here Subscription is better than Polling technique.

share|improve this answer

As you're already using WMI, I would recommend using a temporary event subscription to watch for changes to the processes. The process can be synchronous, asynchronous, or semi-synchronous (usually the recommended choice) and you can specify a polling interval with a WITHIN clause.

This query watches for process creation events:

SELECT targetInstance FROM __InstanceCreationEvent 
  WHERE targetinstance isa "Win32_Process" -- or Win32_ProcessStartTrace

This one watches for process end events:

SELECT targetInstance FROM __InstanceDeletionEvent 
  WHERE targetinstance isa "Win32_Process" -- or Win32_ProcessStartTrace

This question has an example of how to use the ManagementEventWatcher class in C#.

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