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I have set a continuous project for my class which is available online for students and parents can interact with. So I ask students to email their project progress everyday. I use imap to get the info and display it online.

I understand email addresses can be spoofed. How can I find out if the mail really did come from yahoo, gmail or hotmail. Which imap function could i use. i tried this

imap_headerinfo($inbox, $emails[$x])

But It does not give me ip address of the servers it passed through.

I appreciate any help.

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You verify that by checking the socket that IMAP is connected with. What's your connection variable? Example $connection or the connect() call? to be fair to us helping you, please post all your relevant code. I assume $inbox is a hook to the selected inbox and $emails is a hook to the email array in the selected inbox? or is $inbox your connection handler? if so, print_r($inbox); –  Torxed Feb 6 '13 at 11:40
    
@Torxed is the connections handler. $emails[$] is email number.. –  Leah Collins Feb 6 '13 at 11:49
    
$inbox is the connection handler? Then do: print_r($inbox); –  Torxed Feb 6 '13 at 11:58
    
But this assumes that this code is run on the server uppon arrival of emails, otherwise you would need to check the meta-data of the email itself for 'sent from <hostname>'.. This is stored in the email itself. Try print_r(imap_headerinfo($inbox, $emails[$x])); and see what data you can retrieve? –  Torxed Feb 6 '13 at 12:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted
$mailinfo = imap_headerinfo($inbox, $emails[$x]);
print_r($mailinfo->from);

Should give you: personal, adl, mailbox, and host

Any of the following should help you $mailinfo->...:
(For a full reference, check http://php.net/manual/en/function.imap-headerinfo.php)

->to - an array of objects from the To: line, with the following properties: personal, adl, mailbox, and host

->from - an array of objects from the From: line, with the following properties: personal, adl, mailbox, and host

->ccaddress - full cc: line, up to 1024 characters

->cc - an array of objects from the Cc: line, with the following properties: personal, adl, mailbox, and host

->bccaddress - full bcc: line, up to 1024 characters

->bcc - an array of objects from the Bcc: line, with the following properties: personal, adl, mailbox, and host

->reply_toaddress - full Reply-To: line, up to 1024 characters

->reply_to - an array of objects from the Reply-To: line, with the following properties: personal, adl, mailbox, and host

->senderaddress - full sender: line, up to 1024 characters

->sender - an array of objects from the Sender: line, with the following properties: personal, adl, mailbox, and host

->return_pathaddress - full Return-Path: line, up to 1024 characters

->return_path - an array of objects from the Return-Path: line, with the following properties: personal, adl, mailbox, and host

Why hostname is important: enter image description here

(Sorry for the shaky image, sitting on a train)

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imap_headerinfo does give you the host, but I want the ip address. –  Leah Collins Feb 6 '13 at 12:30
    
Why? Why is the IP relevant? the host is a reversed lookup on the IP upon arriving from the server. A IP can be changed every 5 seconds in worst case scenario, so when that email arrived.. it might have been sent from one ip.. but the server which it originated from might have changed it's ip during that time so that IP might belong to Olga, poor old grandmother of some kid in texas.. –  Torxed Feb 6 '13 at 12:33
    
From a network perspective, the IP is just a state variable.. It's only good for the current now and then.. When you connect to somewhere else to get a log, the IP doesn't say you much because that's in another present time. So you are most likely looking for the reversed lookup on that IP which is, the hostname in the content i referred to :) This is why the e-mail server is designed to verify stuff like this upon arrival and not something you should be trying to do after the mail has been stored on the server already. MX records yada yada yada :) –  Torxed Feb 6 '13 at 12:41
    
Added a description of why you can accept the Hostname as a valid verification on the email data. –  Torxed Feb 6 '13 at 16:59
1  
+1 for making my random browsing of SO questions fun. –  Xeoncross Mar 1 '13 at 22:02

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