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when I'm trying to execute the following multhiThreading code multiple times ,the output is not same as previous one . Is that because of JVM behaviour or may be some other reason . please help me some one.

program:


package example.thread.com;

class MyThread1 implements Runnable {
    Thread t;

    MyThread1(String s) {
        t = new Thread(this, s);
        t.start();
    }

    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            System.out.println("Thread Name  :"
                    + Thread.currentThread().getName());
            try {
                Thread.sleep(2000);
            } catch (Exception e) {
            }
        }
    }
}


public class RunnableThread1 {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        System.out.println("Thread Name :" + Thread.currentThread().getName());
        MyThread1 m1 = new MyThread1("My Thread 1");
        MyThread1 m2 = new MyThread1("My Thread 2");
    }
}

output: if i run 1st time

Thread Name :main
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2

output: if i run 2nd time

Thread Name :main
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2

output: if i run 3rd time

Thread Name :main
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1

like this please suggest .....

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4  
Surprise! It's called concurrency. –  Marko Topolnik Feb 6 '13 at 11:41
3  
This is the very essence of multithreaded programming, please consult some literature / tutorials on the subject before making assumptions here... –  akaIDIOT Feb 6 '13 at 11:41
    
Because you do not approved or an answer? –  Edgard Leal Feb 7 '13 at 11:49

6 Answers 6

This is precisely the point of the example. It shows that threads are scheduled at a whim and that output is not guaranteed to occur in order.

In other programming languages and systems it is not unreasonable to expect mangled output such as:

Thread Name :main
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread NThread Name  :My Thread 2ame  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
ThreaThread Name  :My d Name  :My ThrThread 2ead 1
Thread Name  :My Thread 2
Thread Name  :My Thread 1
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I think you should read on multithreading and concurrency concepts of JAVA. Its always a good practice to read concept first and then hands-on with codes

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You have two threads that run in parallel and print their name a few times. Depending on many factors, Thread 1 might start first or it could be Thread 2. This will be more or less random.

Then the sleep does not have a very precise resolution, so one thread might sleep 2001 ms while the other sleeps 1999 ms - once again this will be fairly random.

Note: You should not start threads from your constructor, it would be better to do something like:

MyThread1 m1 = new MyThread1("My Thread 1");
new Thrad(m1).start();

and remove all references to threads from MyThread1 - which you could by the way rename MyRunnable1 to be consistent.

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Is that because of JVM behaviour ...

Yes. Many aspects of Java threading (and indeed threading in other languages) are non-deterministic. That is, they cannot be predicted, and vary from one run depending factors that you have no control over.

So when you write a multi-threaded application, you need to ensure that it doesn't depend for correctness one of these points of non-determinism.

In this case, the non-determinism stems from a number of sources. For instance:

  • When you call thread.start() it is not specified whether or not thread will actually start executing instructions before the call returns.

  • When you call thread.sleep(2000), the actual length of time that the thread sleeps is at least 2000 milliseconds.

  • When there are a number of live threads that could run, you cannot predict which ones (or even how many) will run. It is up to the OS-level thread scheduler.

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Your run() method in MyThread1 us running in 2 different threads at the same time. Each thread counts to 5, printing its name each count. The operation of writing to the output is atomic, meaning that only one thread at a time can do the writing. So one when thread is ready to write, but the other thread has got there first, it has to wait until the other thread finishes writing before it can start writing. There's no way of telling which thread will get there first, so it's different each time.

Imagine 2 people asked to write their name 5 times on a bit of paper. There's only one bit of paper, they have to share it. In order to write their name, they first get the bit of paper. If the other person has it, they wait. When they finish writing their name once, they let go of the bit of paper. When both people are ready to write their name again and no-one has the bit of paper, it's random chance who gets it first.

Hence different results each time...

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The effect you see is only partly the result of JVM behavior. The JVM merely creates the threads and starts them. The operating system is responsible for deciding which thread runs on which processor when. Your threads will contend for use of a processor not just with each other, but with all the work your computer is doing.

When a thread sleeps, it stops being a runnable thread that can use a processor. When it gets to the end of its sleep time it goes back to being runnable, and contending for use of a processor. At some time after that, the operating system will pick it as the thread to run on a processor, and it will go on computing. It keeps the processor until it terminates, sleeps, has to wait for something else, or the operating system decides it is another thread's turn.

There is no reason to expect the ordering between the two threads to be the same from run to run. Writing multi-threaded programs that give consistent results takes some effort.

I suggest starting with some basic tutorials on multi-thread programming. When you are ready to learn more deeply about the subject, I recommend Java Concurrency in Practice

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