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#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

void main()
{
char *arr;
arr=(char *)malloc(sizeof (char)*4);
scanf("%s",arr);
printf("%s",arr);
}

In the above program, do I really need to allocate the arr? It is giving me the result even without using the malloc. My second doubt is ' I am expecting an error in 9th line because I think it must be printf("%s",*arr); or something.

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4 Answers 4

do I really need to allocate the arr?

Yes, otherwise you're dereferencing an uninitialised pointer (i.e. writing to a random chunk of memory), which is undefined behaviour.

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Personally, I think this a very bad example of allocating memory.

A char * will take up, in a modern OS/compiler, at least 4 bytes, and on a 64-bit machine, 8 bytes. So you use four bytes to store the location of the four bytes for your three-character string. Not only that, but malloc will have overheads, that add probably between 16 and 32 bytes to the actual allocated memory. So, we're using something like 20 to 40 bytes to store 4 bytes. That's a 5-10 times more than it actually needs.

The code also casts malloc, which is wrong in C.

And with only four bytes in the buffer, the chances of scanf overflowing is substantial.

Finally, there is no call to free to return the memory to the system.

It would be MUCH better to use:

int len;
char arr[5];
fgets(arr, sizeof(arr), stdin);
len = strlen(arr);
if (arr[len] == '\n') arr[len] = '\0';

This will not overflow the string, and only use 9 bytes of stackspace (not counting any padding...), rather than 4-8 bytes of stackspace and a good deal more on the heap. I added an extra character to the array, so that it allows for the newline. Also added code to remove the newline that fgets adds, as otherwise someone would complain about that, I'm sure.

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casting malloc in NOT wrong in C... You can cast what you want when you want. It may be not useful logically wrong to cast, but it can't be wrong perse. –  Jean-Baptiste Yunès Feb 6 '13 at 17:24
    
It is unnecessary (malloc returns void*, which in C can be converted to any other pointer), and can hide problems such as "no declaration of malloc means returning int, which cuts the pointer in half on 640-bit machines". –  Mats Petersson Feb 6 '13 at 17:26
  • In the above program, do I really need to allocate the arr?

You bet you do.


  • It is giving me the result even without using the malloc.

Sure, that's entirely possible... arr is a pointer. It points to a memory location. Before you do anything with it, it's uninitialized... so it's pointing to some random memory location. The key here is wherever it's pointing is a place your program is not guaranteed to own. That means you can just do the scanf() and at that random location that arr is pointing to the value will go, but another program can overwrite that data.

When you say malloc(X) you're telling the computer that you need X bytes of memory for your own usage that no one else can touch. Then when arr captures the data it will be there safely for your usage until you call free() (which you forgot to do in your program BTW)

This is a good example of why you should always initialize your pointers to NULL when you create them... it reminds you that you don't own what they're pointing at and you better point them to something valid before using them.


  • I am expecting an error in 9th line because I think it must be printf("%s",*arr)

Incorrect. scanf() wants an address, which is what arr is pointing to, that's why you don't need to do: scanf("%s", &arr). And printf's "%s" specificier wants a character array (a pointer to a string of characters) which again is what arr is, so no need to deference.

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" The key here is wherever it's pointing is a place your program doesn't own." not really. Since it's a random location, you may very well own that location. Too bad when it happens to point at the same place as your instruction pointer though. –  Cubic Feb 6 '13 at 12:35
    
@Cubic - symantics, but you are correct. "not guaranteed to own" is a much better way of phrasing it. –  Mike Feb 6 '13 at 12:37

do I really need to allocate the arr?

You need to set arr to point to a block of memory you own, either by calling malloc or by setting it to point to another array. Otherwise it points to a random memory address that may or may not be accessible to you.

In C, casting the result of malloc is discouraged1; it's unnecessary, and in some cases can mask an error if you forget to include stdlib.h or otherwise don't have a prototype for malloc in scope.

I usually recommend malloc calls be written as

T *ptr = malloc(N * sizeof *ptr);

where T is whatever type you're using, and N is the number of elements of that type you want to allocate. sizeof *ptr is equivalent to sizeof (T), so if you ever change T, you won't need to duplicate that change in the malloc call itself. Just one less maintenance headache.

It is giving me the result even without using the malloc

Because you don't explicitly initialize it in the declaration, the initial value of arr is indeterminate2; it contains a random bit string that may or may not correspond to a valid, writable address. The behavior on attempting to read or write through an invalid pointer is undefined, meaning the compiler isn't obligated to warn you that you're doing something dangerous. On of the possible outcomes of undefined behavior is that your code appears to work as intended. In this case, it looks like you're accessing a random segment of memory that just happens to be writable and doesn't contain anything important.

My second doubt is ' I am expecting an error in 9th line because I think it must be printf("%s",*arr); or something.

The %s conversion specifier tells printf that the corresponding argument is of type char *, so printf("%s", arr); is correct. If you had used the %c conversion specifier, then yes, you would need to dereference arr with either the * operator or a subscript, such as printf("%c", *arr); or printf("%c", arr[i]);.

Also, unless your compiler documentation explicitly lists it as a valid signature, you should not define main as void main(); either use int main(void) or int main(int argc, char **argv) instead.


1. The cast is required in C++, since C++ doesn't allow you to assign void * values to other pointer types without an explicit cast
2. This is true for pointers declared at block scope. Pointers declared at file scope (outside of any function) or with the static keyword are implicitly initialized to NULL.

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