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I'm quite new to C#, and have made a class that I would like to use in my main class. These two classes are in different files, but when I try to import one into the other with using, cmd says says

The type or namespace name "MyClass" could not be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?

I know that in Java I have to mess around with CLASSPATH to get things like this to work, but I have no idea about C#.

Additional details:

As you've probably figured out, I'm compiling and executing via command prompt. I'm compiling my non-main class using /target:library (I heard that only main classes should be .exe-files).

My code looks like this:

public class MyClass {
    void stuff() {

    }
}

and my main class:

using System;
using MyClass;

public class MyMainClass {
    static void Main() {
        MyClass test = new MyClass();
        /* Doesn't work */
    }
}

I have tried to encompass my non-main class with namespace MyNamespace { } and importing that, but it doesn't work either.

share|improve this question
    
You do pass the generated library as an input to the compiler when you compile the main class, right? Also, you should be able to pass both source files together to the compiler - no need for a library here. –  Alex Feb 6 '13 at 11:58
    
Have you added the other file (the one where MyClass is in) to the solution in Visual studio? –  Jens Kloster Feb 6 '13 at 11:59
1  
@JensKloster What solution? What visual studio? I'm not using an IDE, I'm using command prompt. –  Bluefire Feb 6 '13 at 12:06
    
@Alex How do I do that? :o –  Bluefire Feb 6 '13 at 12:08
    
Why do you compile from the command line? The first class is compiled into a DLL-file. When you compile the second assembly (with MyMainClass) you will have to reference the first assembly. If you're using C# Project files (*.csproj) from Visual Studio, right click on "References", "Add Reference...", and point to the DLL from your first compilation. If you don't use csproj-files, use /r compiler option. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Feb 6 '13 at 12:12

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

using is for namespaces only - if both classes are in the same namespace just drop the using.

You have to reference the assembly created in the first step when you compile the .exe:

csc /t:library /out:MyClass.dll MyClass.cs
csc /reference:MyClass.dll /t:exe /out:MyProgram.exe MyMainClass.cs

You can make things simpler if you just compile the files together:

csc /t:exe /out:MyProgram.exe MyMainClass.cs MyClass.cs

or

csc /t:exe /out:MyProgram.exe *.cs

EDIT: Here's how the files should look like:

MyClass.cs:

namespace MyNamespace {
    public class MyClass {
        void stuff() {

        }
    }
}

MyMainClass.cs:

using System;

namespace MyNamespace {
    public class MyMainClass {
        static void Main() {
            MyClass test = new MyClass();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But when I do have them both in the same namespace, it gives me exactly the same error when I try to use it. –  Bluefire Feb 6 '13 at 12:16
1  
@Bluefire Post the command line that you use to compile them and the content of the files, including the namespaces. –  Alex Feb 6 '13 at 12:18
    
Best answer since it actually gives the command lines for compiling. Original Poster will have to decide if he wants the classes in two separate assemblies (compile one class to library (DLL), then compile second class to executable with reference to DLL of first compilation) or in just one assembly (compile once with both files). This is something many people manage by having "projects" inside Visual Studio where the projects reference each other (in a non-circular way) and each project can containg one or more code files. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Feb 6 '13 at 14:11

Well what you have to "import" (use) is the namespace of MyClass not the class name itself. If both classes are in the same namespace, you don't have to "import" it.

Definition MyClass.cs

namespace Ns1
{
  public class MyClass
  {
    ...
  }
}

Usage AnotherClass.cs

using Ns1;

namespace AnotherNs
{
  public class AnotherClass
  {
    public AnotherClass()
    {
      var myInst = new MyClass();
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
namepsace MyNamespace{
  public class MyMainClass {
    static void Main(){
      MyClass test = new MyClass();
    }
  }
  public class MyClass {
    void Stuff(){

    }
  }
 }

You have no need for using a namespace then because it is all encompased in the same namespace.

If you are unsure of what namespace your class is located, type the class (case sensitive you wish to use) then with your cursor on the class, use CTRL + . and it will offer you a manual import.

share|improve this answer

MyClass is a class not a namespace. So this code is wrong:

using MyClass //THIS CODE IS NOT CORRECT

You should check the namespace of the MyClass (e.g: MyNamespace). Then call it in a proper way:

MyNamespace.MyClass myClass =new MyNamespace.MyClass();
share|improve this answer

using is used for importing namespaces not classes.

So if your class is in namespace X

namespace X
{
    public class MyClass {
         void stuff() {

         }
    }
}

then to use it in another namespace where you want it

using System;
using X;

public class MyMainClass {
    static void Main() {
        MyClass test = new MyClass();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If they are separate class files within the same project, then you do not need to have an 'import' statement. Just use the class straight off. If the files are in separate projects, you need to add a reference to the project first before you can use an 'import' statement on it.

share|improve this answer

If the other class is compiled as a library (i.e. a dll) and this is how you want it, you should add a reference from visual studio, browse and point to to the dll file.

If what you want is to incorporate the OtherClassFile.cs into your project, and the namespace is already identical, you can:

  1. Close your solution,
  2. Open YourProjectName.csproj file, and look for this section:

    <ItemGroup>                                            
        <Compile Include="ExistingClass1.cs" />                     
        <Compile Include="ExistingClass2.cs" />                                 
        ...
        <Compile Include="Properties\AssemblyInfo.cs" />     
    </ItemGroup>
    
  1. Check that the .cs file that you want to add is in the project folder (same folder as all the existing classes in the solution).

  2. Add an entry inside as below, save and open the project.

    <Compile Include="OtherClassFile.cs" /> 
    

Your class, will now appear and behave as part of the project. No using is needed. This can be done multiple files in one shot.

share|improve this answer

The only thing you can do is to put both of them in the same namespace. Then , you need not import it. You can directly access it.

using System;
namespace MyNamespace
{
    public class SampleClass1
    {
       //Can access SampleClass2 here
     }
}


 using System;
    namespace MyNamespace
    {
        public class SampleClass2
        {
              //Can access SampleClass1 here
            }
    }

using System;

namespace MyNamespace
{
    class MainClass
    {
        public static void Main (string[] args)
        {
               //Can access both of above classes
         }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You: The only thing you can do is to put both of them in the same namespace. Incorrect. Types in different namespaces can refer each other. This is not really about namespaces, it's about compiling multiple code files from the command line. Also, the concept of namespaces is orthogonal to the concepts of projects/modules/assemblies. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Feb 6 '13 at 14:16
    
@JeppeStigNielsen Sorry for this silly mistake of mine...but the question was edited after my answer. Previously, it was about using the other class in the main method and the asker was importing the class directly, so it was correct answer at that time..You can edit my answer if wrong at current context..Thank you sir for orthogonal concept..!! –  Bhushan Firake Feb 6 '13 at 15:55

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