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Can anyone tell me how to select the 'a' within the 'li' from the class 'active_page'? I tried the following but it does not work:

if($('.active_page').next('.page_link').length==true){
    go_to_page(new_page);
}


<ul>
    <li>
        <a class="previous_link" href="javascript:go_to_previous();">Prev</a>
    </li>
    <li>
        <a class="page_link active_page" href="javascript:go_to_page(0)" longdesc="0">1</a>
    </li>
    <li>
        <a class="page_link" href="javascript:go_to_page(1)" longdesc="1">2</a>
    </li>
    <li>
        <a class="page_link" href="javascript:go_to_page(2)" longdesc="2">3</a>
    </li>
    <li>
        <a class="next_link" href="javascript:go_to_next();">Next</a>
    </li>
</ul>

Thanks

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Can anyone tell me how to select the 'a' within the 'li' from the class 'active_page'? But the link has the class, so you'd just use the selector $("a.active_page") – Archer Feb 6 '13 at 12:03

You have to go up one level since it's the <li> that are siblings:

if ($(".active_page").parent().next().children('.page_link').length) {

}

If that's a little verbose for you, you can use indices:

if ($(".page_link").eq($(".active_page").index("li .page_link") + 1)).length) {

}

Just to prove that these both work: http://jsfiddle.net/ExplosionPIlls/t5NDX/

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1  
"If that's a little verbose for you...then here use this longer, less readable one"? Lol. +1 all the same – nbrooks Feb 6 '13 at 12:25
    
@nbrooks true, but there is one less method call – Explosion Pills Feb 6 '13 at 12:36
    
Yeah, but parent and next are simple O(1) operations. children also just accesses a property of the current DOM element. But using both eq and index require full DOM traversals and building up full collections of elements that you aren't going to end up using, since you only need 1. – nbrooks Feb 6 '13 at 12:43
    
I think I did not understand the OP question. Why isn't the answer simply $("a.active_page") as Archer suggested in the comment? – Adam Apr 18 at 11:14

next looks for a sibling, but the a element has no siblings. Its parent li does:

if($('.active_page').parent().next().find('.page_link').length){
    go_to_page(new_page);
}

Also, length is a number, don't compare it to true. If you want to know if length is not 0, the above works.

share|improve this answer
    
wouldn't it have to be .next().children('.page_link') or .next().find('.page_link')? The <li> itself is selected from .next() so the class filter will fail .. right? – Explosion Pills Feb 6 '13 at 12:02
    
@ExplosionPills: Thanks, I somehow managed to miss that. Fixed. – T.J. Crowder Feb 6 '13 at 12:05

not sure what you are tryin to do but

$('.active_page');

itself should give you the <a> element

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