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We are using JSF, Spring and JPA in our application. We are trying to simplify our Exception Handling strategy for our project.

Our application architecture is like below:

UI(JSF) --> Managed Beans --> Service --> DAO

We are using Exception Translation bean post processor for DAO layer. This is configured in Spring Application Context file.

<bean class="org.springframework.dao.annotation.PersistenceExceptionTranslationPostProcessor" /> 

Where Spring wraps all database exceptions to 'org.springframework.dao.DataAccessException'. We are not doing any other exception handling in DAO Layer.

Our strategy to handle exceptions like below:

Presentation Layer:

Class PresentationManangedBean{

 try{
      serviceMethod();
   }catch(BusinessException be){
      // Mapping exception messages to show on UI
   }
   catch(Exception e){
       // Mapping exception messages to show on UI
   }

}

Service Layer

@Component("service")
Class Service{

 @Transactional(propagation = Propagation.REQUIRED, readOnly = false, rollbackFor = BusinessException.class)
 public serviceMethod(){

  try{

      daoMethod();

   }catch(DataAccessException cdae){
      throws new BusinessException(); // Our Business/Custom exception
   }
   catch(Exception e){
      throws new BusinessException();  //  Our Business/Custom exception
   }
 }

}

DAO Layer

@Repository("dao")
Class DAO{

 public daoMethod(){
  // No exception is handled
  // If any DataAccessException or RuntimeException is occurred this 
  // is thrown to ServiceLayer
 }

}

Question: We just want to confirm whether above approach is as per the best practices. If not, please suggest us the best way to handle the exceptions (playing with transaction management)?

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3 Answers

This approach looks good to me.We are using same kind of approach in our project.

Vinay

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I use a different approach:

-I don't catch the DAE of Spring in the DAO. I let them flow up to the Controller (JSF managed bean).

-In the controller I catch any Exception (with just one "catch").

-I call a custom "handleException" method which receives the Exception caught in a parameter.

-This exception handler checks (for example,with an "if-then-else" sentence) what kind of exception is the parameter, and shows the message to the user according to that kind of exception. In my case I look for the message to show in a properties file, where the key (and the args if any) of the message are attributes of the exception (I put them there when I throw it). In particular, if you want to handle DAE in a special way, you can put an "if" branch for it in this exception handler method, and do whatever you want with it.

I think this approach is better and cleaner, because you have the exception handling in just one point, and you don't have to put so much "throws-try-catch" in every level, just in the Controller (JSF).

Of course, you can use "try-catch" in services for particular exceptions, if what you want to do in that particular case is some business logic, instead of showing a message to the user.

And also, if you don't want to deal with Spring DAE in the controller, you can wrap it into a business exception of your own and re-throw. But do this in the service layer, not in DAO.

Hope this answer helps.

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Your approach is very much in line with the Spring Frameworks recommendations and also avoids percolating lots of checked exceptions across the layers of your application.

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