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I encountered an issue when I was using Task.Factory.StartNew and tried to capture an exception that is thrown. In my application I have a long running task that I want to encapsulate in a Task.Factory.StartNew(.., TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);

However, the exception isn't caught when I'm using Task.Factory.StartNew. It is however working as I expect when I use Task.Run, which I thought was just a wrapper on Task.Factory.StartNew (according to for instance this MSDN article).

A working example is provided here, the difference being that the exception is written to console when using Task.Run, but not when using Factory.StartNew.

My question would be:
if I have a LongRunning task that has the possibility to throw exceptions, how should I handle them in the calling code?

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Task<bool> t = RunLongTask();
    t.Wait();
    Console.WriteLine(t.Result);
    Console.ReadKey();
}

private async static Task<bool> RunLongTask()
{
    try
    {
        await RunTaskAsync();
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(e);
        return false;
    }
    Console.WriteLine("success");
    return true;
}

private static Task RunTaskAsync()
{
    //return Task.Run(async () =>
    //    {
    //        throw new Exception("my exception");
    //    });
    return Task.Factory.StartNew(
        async () =>
    {
        throw new Exception("my exception");
    });

}
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What happens if you do Task.Factory.StartNew(someAction, CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.DenyChildAttach, TaskScheduler.Default) - do you get the same result? –  Matthew Watson Feb 6 '13 at 13:06
    
@MatthewWatson yes, same result unfortunately –  Default Feb 6 '13 at 13:07
    
Also, see here: blogs.msdn.com/b/pfxteam/archive/2011/10/24/10229468.aspx (one of the comments near the end asks a similar question) –  Matthew Watson Feb 6 '13 at 13:13
    
@MatthewWatson I can't see which comment though.. The one from nick seems to only handle the difference between await Task.Run(() => .. and await Task.Run(async () => .. –  Default Feb 6 '13 at 13:17
    
Hmm yes, I was assuming the async thing was something to do with it. Perhaps it's not! –  Matthew Watson Feb 6 '13 at 13:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Your problem is that StartNew doesn't work like Task.Run with async delegates. The return type of StartNew is Task<Task> (which is convertible to Task). The "outer" Task represents the beginning of the method, and the "inner" Task represents the completion of the method (including any exceptions).

To get to the inner Task, you can use Unwrap. Or you can just use Task.Run instead of StartNew for async code. LongRunning is just an optimization hint and is really optional. Stephen Toub has a good blog post on the difference between StartNew and Run and why Run is (usually) better for async code.

Update from @usr comment below: LongRunning only applies to the beginning of the async method (up until the first incomplete operation is awaited). So it's almost certainly better all around to use Task.Run in this case.

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At my work, we are however encouraged to use these optimization hints. Would it be better if I instead of converting it to a async void use a return value from the Factory.StartNew (is that even possible)? –  Default Feb 6 '13 at 13:13
1  
To reduce confusion, I'd recommend making it a separate method. Also read Stephen Toub's blog post; if you use the older StartNew with the newer async code, you probably want to also call Unwrap. –  Stephen Cleary Feb 6 '13 at 13:18
    
I'll read that and get back to you. –  Default Feb 6 '13 at 13:19
1  
LongRunning is identical to forcing a new thread to be created in practice. And your async method is probably not on that thread for a long time (it is taken off at the first await point). You don't want LongRunning in this case. –  usr Feb 6 '13 at 13:40
1  
@Default the compiler is generally unable to analyze your code in any major way. Also the compiler does not know anything about the TPL. The TPL is a library. And this library will just always launch a new thread. Specify LongRunning iff your task will almost always burn 100% CPU for multiple seconds or will block for multiple seconds with very high probability. –  usr Feb 6 '13 at 13:55

I'll pull some of my comments into an answer because they turned out to be helpful:

LongRunning is identical to forcing a new thread to be created in practice. And your async method is probably not on that thread for a long time (it is taken off at the first await point). You don't want LongRunning in this case.

It does not matter how long the async method runs. The thread is destroyed at the very first await (that operates on a non-completed task).

Can the compiler use this hint in any way? The compiler is generally unable to analyze your code in any major way. Also the compiler does not know anything about the TPL. The TPL is a library. And this library will just always launch a new thread. Specify LongRunning iff your task will almost always burn 100% CPU for multiple seconds or will block for multiple seconds with very high probability.

My guess is you don't want LongRunning here because if you're blocking, why are you using async in the first place? async is about not blocking but getting off the thread.

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do you have any reference about the LongRunning being taken of at the first await point? I'd like to read more about it –  Default Feb 7 '13 at 7:46
    
@Default await queues a callback to be executed when the operation is complete. Having done that it always returns from the function. The TPL sees the return and ends the task (and the thread) (remember, there are two tasks here - see Stephen Cleary's answer. One (outer) task completes at the first await point and returns the inner task while the inner task completes at the end). See the blog series by Eric Lippert called "Asynchrony in C# 5". The language does not guarantee "being taken of at the first await point". This emerges from other behaviors kind of by coincidence. –  usr Feb 7 '13 at 9:55

It should be possible when you first Unwrap the task:

await RunTaskAsync().Unwrap();

Or alternatively:

await await RunTaskAsync();
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