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I want to do something like this

foreach (var item in SeasonList)
{
    if (item.Text == "ALL")
    {
        item.IsSelected = true;
    }
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Daniel Hilgarth, Frédéric Hamidi, J. Steen, John Koerner, Linger Feb 6 '13 at 19:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
And what's stopping you? – Romoku Feb 6 '13 at 13:14
    
i want to do The looping and conditioning using LINQ/LAMBDA – Gowtham Feb 6 '13 at 13:15
1  
@Romoku: But you can modify the objects inside a list while enumerating! That's an important distinction. – Daniel Hilgarth Feb 6 '13 at 13:18
4  
Why this unnecessary urge to use linq? It's like the new regex of our age - have a problem? Solve it with linq! – J. Steen Feb 6 '13 at 13:20
1  
@Romoku: I don't follow. The OP doesn't want to change the list. He simply wants to change the properties of the items inside the list. – Daniel Hilgarth Feb 6 '13 at 13:23
up vote 18 down vote accepted
foreach(var item in SeasonList.Where(x => x.Text == "ALL"))
{
    item.Selected = false;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Simple, understandable, good use of LINQ and foreach (yes, it's possible to write loops with LINQ!), +1. – ken2k Feb 6 '13 at 13:27
    
Agreed. Let's play fair, this is a good solution. – Larry Feb 6 '13 at 13:31
    
@Aron: Thanks for the solution – Gowtham Apr 19 '13 at 12:18

This may work also, but in my opinion, what you did is already good.

SeasonList.ForEach(s => s.IsSelected = s.TEXT != "ALL");

Or, to match exactly initial requirements :

SeasonList.Where(s => s.TEXT == "ALL").ToList().ForEach(s => s.IsSelected = false);
share|improve this answer
2  
FYI, this is not entirely correct. This will also set IsSelected to true when TEXT == "ALL"; the original code only set entries to false and did not modify them otherwise (though I'll bet that this is the correct intent) – Chris Sinclair Feb 6 '13 at 13:21
    
I think still not proper, OP does not want to change IsSelected if item.Text is not "ALL" – daryal Feb 6 '13 at 13:22
    
You are right, I missed this implementation detail. Another edit then. – Larry Feb 6 '13 at 13:25
SeasonList.ForEach(q => q.IsSelected = q.Text == "ALL" ? false : q.IsSelected)
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class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<ItemObject> items = new List<ItemObject>()
        {
            new ItemObject() { Text = "Text 1", IsSelected = true },
            new ItemObject() { Text = "Text 2", IsSelected = true },
            new ItemObject() { Text = "ALL", IsSelected = true }
        };

        items.ForEach(x => { if (x.Text == "ALL") x.IsSelected = false; });
    }
}

class ItemObject
{
    public string Text { get; set; }
    public bool IsSelected { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer

Update using index

        var index = SeasonList.FindIndex(x => x.Text == "ALL");
        if (index > 0) SeasonList[index].IsSelected = false;

Another option

      foreach (var item in SeasonList.FindAll(x => x.Text == "ALL"))
        {
            item.IsSelected = false;
        }

Note:

Check Jon Skeet's answer LINQ is for querying - not for updating.

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