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Its a bit unclear how Javascript internally is doing the request. I know its not using the build-in

browser XMLHttpRequest, but how does it do it? Read an article on stackoverflow where they simply create a Javascript

object and set the var obj = document.createElement('script'); obj.src = "http://somedomain.com?blabla=yes"

Using JavaScript to perform a GET request without AJAX

Here from jQuery:

 $.ajax({
        type: 'GET',
        url: url,
        async: false,
        jsonpCallback: 'jsonCallback',
        contentType: "application/json",
        dataType: 'jsonp',
        success: function(json) {
            console.log("console. hurra");
        },
        error: function(e) {
            console.log(e.message);
        }
    });

Do you know how does jQuery internally build up the request in Javascript and submit it?

I tried this locally and it worked like charm in the sense that the the script was inserted correctly in my page. var CampaignNs = {

GET: function(url) {
    var head = document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0];
    var n = document.createElement('script');
    n.src = url;
    n.type = 'text/javascript';
    n.onload = function() { // this is not really mandatory, but removes the tag when finished.
        head.removeChild(n);
    };
    head.appendChild(n);
}

}

I advance thanks

Good article here: http://johnnywey.wordpress.com/2012/05/20/jsonp-how-does-it-work/#comment-359

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closed as not a real question by zzzzBov, Quentin, dystroy, Justin Satyr, Some Guy Feb 6 '13 at 15:07

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Have you tried looking at the jQuery source code? –  Aaron Kurtzhals Feb 6 '13 at 14:50
    
Search for ajax: in the source code. –  dystroy Feb 6 '13 at 14:51
    
Is the question only "what's the source code for the ajax function ?" ? If that's the case, I'll vote to close. –  dystroy Feb 6 '13 at 14:52
    
Are you talking about JSONP specifically? –  Floyd Pink Feb 6 '13 at 14:52
1  
"I know its not using the build-in (sic) browser XMLHttpRequest" - well, you'd be wrong. –  zzzzBov Feb 6 '13 at 14:53

1 Answer 1

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Using XHTTPRequest or inserting tags are both valid ways to trigger GET requests. XHTTPRequests are cleaner in many ways tough because they don't involve messing around in the DOM.

Its a bit unclear how Javascript internally is doing the request. I know its not using the build-in

browser XMLHttpRequest, but how does it do it?

This makes no sense. JavaScript (i.e. the JavaScript implementation in your browser) need not rely on XHTTPRequest, it just invokes the browser's HTTP APIs if it needs to do requests. Which it doesn't need to do except through XHTTPRequest :-)

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1  
Thanks! And thanks to the initial comments. I looked through the source code and found it. I understand now that JsonP basically is just like loading any Javascript file. These frameworks only create a script tag, set the script URL attribute and when the script tag is added to the DOM the browser makes the GET request. Then I also finally understood why we with this technique only can perform GET and not PUT, POST and DELETE –  Thomas Vervik Feb 6 '13 at 15:08

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