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I am doing a program that outputs a list of prime numbers with fstream.

I have this so far:

int export_list (int lim = 50)
{
    int x;
    last_in_txt = ????????????; // assigns last number on txt

    ofstream file ("Primes.txt" , ios::app);

    if (file.is_open()) // if it opens correctly
    {
        for (x = last_in_txt ; x < lim ; x++)
        {
            if (check_prime (x)) // returns 1 when x is prime, returns 0 when not
            {
                file<< x << " ";
            }
        }
        cout << "Done!" << endl << pressenter;
        cin.get();
    }
    else
    {
        cout << "Unable to open file" << endl << pressenter;
        cin.get();
    }
    return(0);
}

So, as you can see, this should append a list of prime numbers to Primes.txt, starting with the prime 1234547.

Primes.txt looks like this:

2 3 5 7 11 13 17 19 23 29 31 37 (...) 1234543 1234547 

My question is how do I assign 1234547 (which is the last number of the txt) to the variable last_in_txt?

Other (not so important) question: Should I save the numbers the way I'm currently doing, or should I store each number in a separate line?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One simple way: keep reading and assign until the whole file is read.

For example,

int last_in_txt = 0;
{
    ifstream infile("Prime.txt");
    int k;
    while(infile >> k) {
        last_in_txt = k;
    }
}
// Now last_in_txt is assigned properly, and Prime.txt is closed

This works well no matter the numbers in Prime.txt are separated by space characters (' ') or by newline characters ('\n').

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thank you so much :) I'm gonna try this :)but isn't this going to be hard when the file gets huge? Isn't there any other way? For example, in scheme (lisp dialect) I would use (list tail) to get the last element of the list. –  Henrique Ferrolho Feb 6 '13 at 15:32
    
@HenriqueFerrolho The problem is this is just a file. How many bytes is the last number in the file occupying? Maybe it's a 10000 digit number. You could certainly optimize this if you absolutely need to: You could read a reasonable chunk of text in from the end of the file and then parse it backwards looking for the first whitespace. –  Dave Feb 6 '13 at 15:42
    
@timrau it still isn't working :/ int export_list (int lim = 50) { int last_in_txt = 0; { ifstream infile("Prime.txt"); int k; while(infile >> k) { last_in_txt = k; } } ofstream file ("Primes.txt" , ios::app); int x, counter; if (file.is_open()) { for (x = last_in_txt , counter = 0 ; counter < lim ; x++ , counter++) { if (check_prime (x)) { file << x << " "; } } cout << "Done!" << endl << pressenter; cin.get(); } else { cout << "Unable to open file" << endl << pressenter; cin.get(); } return(0); } –  Henrique Ferrolho Feb 6 '13 at 16:13
    
ups, sorry about the mess above... How can I reply correctly? I'm a nooby –  Henrique Ferrolho Feb 6 '13 at 16:14
    
@HenriqueFerrolho Have you tried debugger to see which part isn't working? –  timrau Feb 6 '13 at 17:01

My suggestion is that you write using binary format into the text file(using wb in C). In this case you will know how many bytes does the last number occupy and you will be able to use seekg and tellg to get it. If you use plain text format you will have to read char by char from the end and this is more error-prone and also slower.

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Why would reading char-by-char be necessary? What's wrong with extracting ints with >>? –  Angew Feb 6 '13 at 15:08
    
@Angew I want to avoid reading all file so I suggest reading from its end. In this case I can't see how you can use >> –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 6 '13 at 15:09
    
I've apparently missed the "from the end" bit. –  Angew Feb 6 '13 at 15:19

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