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The following function gives a compilation error at the point I try to match an empty list:

let rec tuplesToList (acc: int list) (remaining: int*int list) =
    match remaining with
    | [] -> acc
    | (a, b) :: tail -> tuplesToList (a :: b :: acc)

The error is:

This expression was expected to have type int * int list but here has type 'a list

This works fine when remaining is a simple list of ints rather than tuples. How can I match an empty list of tuples?

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You shouldn't have edited your question. It no longer makes sense in light of the answers. I'm rolling it back. –  Daniel Feb 6 '13 at 16:48
1  
Alternatively you could use List.collect let inline tuplesToList xs = xs |> List.collect (fun (a,b) -> [a;b]) –  Phillip Trelford Feb 6 '13 at 18:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

[] is just fine to match an empty list of tuples. But according to your type annotation, remaining is not a list of tuples, it's a tuple containing an int and an int list. A list of tuples would be (int*int) list. int * int list is parsed as int * (int list), not (int * int) list.

If you fix the type, your code should work fine.

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That did the trick, thanks. –  Mark Pattison Feb 6 '13 at 15:13

In addition to sepp2k's observation, you've also forgotten the second parameter (tail) in the recursive call. Also, your code works fine without any type annotations whatsoever:

let rec tuplesToList acc remaining =
  match remaining with
  | [] -> List.rev acc //reverse to preserve original order
  | (a, b) :: tail -> tuplesToList (a :: b :: acc) tail
share|improve this answer
    
...should also say, I wanted to reverse the list as well, so I've left that out. –  Mark Pattison Feb 6 '13 at 15:29

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