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I have 3 threads, two "workers" and one "manager" . The "Workers" threads Waits on EventWaitHandle that the "manager" thread will signal the EventWaitHandle after that them increase theirs counters. The only difference between those "worker" threads is that one uses EventWaitHandle.WaitAny() and the other one uses EventWaitHandle.WaitOne() .

here is the code:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MultiThreadedJobs multyThreadedJobs = new MultiThreadedJobs();
        multyThreadedJobs.Start();

        Console.ReadLine();

        multyThreadedJobs.Stop();
    }
}

class MultiThreadedJobs : IDisposable
{
    private EventWaitHandle syncEvent;
    private EventWaitHandle[] syncEventsArray;

    private Thread managerThread;
    private Thread firstWorkerThread;
    private Thread secondWorkerThread;

    private volatile bool running = false;


    public MultiThreadedJobs() // Ctor
    {
        syncEvent = new EventWaitHandle(false, EventResetMode.AutoReset, "JobsSyncEvent");

        syncEventsArray = new EventWaitHandle[1];
        syncEventsArray[0] = syncEvent;

        managerThread = new Thread(ManagerThreadMethod);
        firstWorkerThread = new Thread(FirstWorkerThreadMethod);
        secondWorkerThread = new Thread(SecondWorkerThreadMethod);
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        running = true;

        managerThread.Start();
        firstWorkerThread.Start();
        secondWorkerThread.Start();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        running = false;
    }

    private void ManagerThreadMethod() // Manager Thread
    {
        while (running)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            syncEvent.Set();
        }
    }

    private void FirstWorkerThreadMethod() // Worker Thread
    {
        int counter = 0;
        while (running)
        {
            syncEvent.WaitOne();
            counter++;
        }
    }

    private void SecondWorkerThreadMethod() // Worker Thread
    {
        int counter = 0;
        while (running)
        {
            EventWaitHandle.WaitAny(syncEventsArray);
            counter++;
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        syncEvent.Close();
    }
}

The problem is, The just the second worker thread with the EventWaitHandle.WaitAny() always catch the Event, and starving the first worker thread. instead of about 50/50 precent to each of them.

share|improve this question
    
Take a look at this: stackoverflow.com/questions/1816099/… – sircodesalot Feb 6 '13 at 15:22
    
Please show all relevant code, where are you doing Thread.Start()? – sll Feb 6 '13 at 15:29
    
@sircodesalot thanks, but i'm not see there any answer for my problem – Jacob Feb 6 '13 at 15:29
    
@sll, the 'Thread.Start()' exist in another method called Start() . – Jacob Feb 6 '13 at 15:31
    
@Sll . all relevant code exist here. – Jacob Feb 6 '13 at 15:37
up vote 10 down vote accepted
+50

You are looking for a solution to a very common problem in software engineering, the Producer-consumer problem. The linked Wikipedia article has decent background info on it, in particular showing how to do it the wrong way.

You are certainly pursuing a solution that's the wrong way. An AutoResetEvent is far too simplistic. You've already found one problem with it, it doesn't provide fairness. Many other problems with it, in particular it suffers from a nasty threading race when the producer thread produces jobs faster than the consumer threads.

The sample code is too artificial to offer a good alternative. Low-level locking can be implemented by the ReaderWriterLock/Slim class. A class that's particularly well suited to solve producer/consumer problems is the .NET 4 BlockingCollection class. Supporting an arbitrary number of producer and consumer threads and providing throttling to ensure that a program doesn't blow up when consumers cannot keep up with the producers. You can rewrite your sample by using a fake "token" that you pass from the producer to the consumer threads. A BlockingColletion<bool> gets the job done.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for the detailed answer. in my situation i need to synchronise also Processes not just Threads , to do this i am using Named Events. but i found that this mechanism not give fairness. like you said. my question is more technically. Why the EventWaitHandle not give fairness? and is there any way to force it to do it more fair ? – Jacob Feb 11 '13 at 9:32

The WaitHandle class makes it possible for clients to make asynchronous call and wait for: a single XML Web service (WaitHandle.WaitOne), the first of many XML Web services (WaitHandle.WaitAny), or all of many XML Web services (WaitHandle.WaitAll) to return results. If you want to process the results as they arrive, you can use the WaitHandle.WaitAny method. This method will indicate that one of the operations has completed and will identify the completed operation.

Both the methods are overiddable. And depending on the parameters passed,the implementation varies.For eg,WaitHandle.WaitAny Method (WaitHandle[], Int32, Boolean) waits for any of the elements in the specified array to receive a signal, using a 32-bit signed integer to measure the time interval, and specifying whether to exit the synchronization domain before the wait.

WaitHandle.WaitOne Method (Int32, Boolean) when overridden in a derived class, blocks the current thread until the current WaitHandle receives a signal, using 32-bit signed integer to measure the time interval and specifying whether to exit the synchronization domain before the wait.

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