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If I have two lines:

line1 = [1 2; ...
         5 4];
line2 = [1 7; ...
         4 2];

enter image description here

How Can I get the intersection point of any two line like the previous ones ?

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closed as not a real question by woodchips, bla, Ash Burlaczenko, Bob Kaufman, finnw Feb 6 '13 at 16:18

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
If you always have the lines in this format, it should not be too hard to write out the formula that gives you the solution. – Dennis Jaheruddin Feb 6 '13 at 15:47
1  
Well, this IS equivalent to a system of TWO linear equations, in two unknowns. If there was any way you could possibly solve those equations, then it might be possible. I wonder? Maybe it is time for you to return to high school algebra? – user85109 Feb 6 '13 at 15:49
    
like the one here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line-line_intersection – bla Feb 6 '13 at 15:49
    
possible duplicate of How do you detect where two line segments intersect? – finnw Feb 6 '13 at 16:18

This is more a math question than a programming one:

An equation for a line is y = ax+b

to find a, you do

a = (y2-y1)/(x2-x1)...

or in your case:

a = (line1(1,2)-line1(2,2))/((line1(1,1)-line1(2,1));

a = 0.5

then you find b with a point in your line, i.e.:

y = 0.5x+b --> 2 = 0.5(1)+b --> b = 1.5;

y1 = 0.5x+1.5

Do the same thing for the other line.

Then do y1 = y2 to solve.

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