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We have a couple of relatively large Web Forms web application projects, but we are limited on using the .net 4.0 because some of our clients are still using Windows Server 2003, and the .net4.5 is not compatible with that OS.

Would it be somehow possible to make the model binding framework created on the .net4.5 work with the .net4.0 WebForms? Maybe something along the lines of extension methods on .net2.0 (although that is obviously almost 100% compile time stuff) or LinqBridge.

If that was possible to some extent, I think I would take the time to do it. Maybe if the code can be extracted from the original sources (I'm downloading them right now to see how it works) and be plugged like an extension or inheritance of sorts in our current page life cycle.

Does that mechanism have some external dependency that would make this prohibitive?

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The WebForms-based feature required changes which are only available in 4.5.

That said, if you require model binding in some form, you could always try using the ASP.NET MVC or WebAPI frameworks for the particular part of your site in which you require model binding, leaving the rest as WebForms. They both currently only require .NET 4.0. And you get the benefit that both of those are supported products.

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Would you care to elaborate on what changes exactly are needed that makes it possible? As I said, if it was something that could be replicated I would go for it. Maybe if I could extend the WebForms 4.0 behavior to do it in some way. – julealgon Mar 13 '13 at 15:06

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