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In my program I am using several classes and tons of functions with(in) them. I would like to know which one of the would work faster or there is no difference in between them in terms of speed.

1st: Class function

class mex{
  public:
    int length,nof_evaluations,nof_fast_evaluations;
    tree T;
    calc_mex(vector<string>,vector<double>);
}; 

which will be called by

mex m;
vector<string> v1;
vector<double> v2;
m.calc_mex(v1,v2);

2nd: Function with class pointer

class mex{
  public:
    int length,nof_evaluations,nof_fast_evaluations;
    tree T;
}; 
calc_mex(mex*,vector<string>,vector<double>);

which will be called by

mex m,*mptr;
mptr=&m;
vector<string> v1;
vector<double> v2;
calc_mex(mptr,v1,v2);

I am using both of the ways in my program, but more inclined to way 1 since it looks cleaner and better organized. I am also calling these type of functions 100K times in a single run of the program. So I am wondering if any of them will work better timing wise.

Thanks!

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4  
Have you tried running a benchmark test? –  David Feb 6 '13 at 16:17
    
I was lazy to do that. Cos I need to change lots of things inside those functions. –  amo bishop roden Feb 6 '13 at 16:21
    
In a lot of cases, there will be no difference at all. When/if there is a difference, it's almost certain to be minuscule. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 6 '13 at 16:27
    
Considering the compiler's just going to turn a non-virtual member function call into a straight C-like function call with a pointer anyway (cause CPUs don't speak C++), it shouldn't make much of a difference at all unless the function's virtual. –  cHao Feb 6 '13 at 17:40

3 Answers 3

Rather than speed the deciding factor should be whether the function logically belongs to the class or not. If yes make it a member. If not make it a free standing function.

BTW each member function is implicitly passed an this pointer so there is not much difference between the two versions. If you are truly concerned about performance. Make a sample program with both versions and profile it in your environment with a large data set.

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thanks Alok Save. Most of those functions logically belong to the classes. I will put those into classes if there is no timing difference. –  amo bishop roden Feb 6 '13 at 16:23
    
Are you calling these billions of times in a loop? –  drescherjm Feb 6 '13 at 17:20

I second the answer given by Alok save and I have to reiterate a statement from Donald Knuth (he's famous, so the statement must be true, obviously...):

Programmers waste enormous amounts of time thinking about, or worrying about, the speed of noncritical parts of their programs, and these attempts at efficiency actually have a strong negative impact when debugging and maintenance are considered. We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil. Yet we should not pass up our opportunities in that critical 3%.

My two cents on this issue: Measure something until you are very sure that your "optimization" will benefit the program. Otherwise, you tend to produce code that becomes more unreadable and unmaintainable as time progresses...

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In C++ all member functions (unless they're virtual) are freestanding functions with "this" passed in as the first argument. You won't get any speed gains from choosing one over the other, they're both just function calls.

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