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This is more of a curious query than an important question, but why when printing hex as an 8 digit number with leading zeros, does this %#08X Not display the same result as 0x%08X?

When I try to use the former, the 08 formatting flag is removed, and it doesn't work with just 8.

Again I was just curious.

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Do you mean 0x%.8X ? That will lead-fill with zeros. (the 0x is just a preamble, but your likely already aware of that). – WhozCraig Feb 6 '13 at 16:23

3 Answers 3

The # part gives you a 0x in the output string. The 0 and the x count against your "8" characters listed in the 08 part. You need to ask for 10 characters if you want it to be the same.

int i = 7;

printf("%#010x\n", i);  // gives 0x00000007
printf("0x%08x\n", i);  // gives 0x00000007
printf("%#08x\n", i);   // gives 0x000007
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Oh right. Thanks for the info. – wsmccusker Feb 6 '13 at 16:51
The top line outputs 14F0x00000007 for me. The second and third work as written. – quantumpotato Jan 6 '14 at 3:15
@quantumpotato - That's... odd. The first and third lines are identical with the exception of the number of 0's they should produce. What was your compiler/system/line of code that produced this? Did you have any lines proceeding the one that printed 14F? – Mike Jan 8 '14 at 14:23
Note that if i = 0;, the versions using %# will not include the 0x prefix. – Jonathan Leffler Nov 19 '14 at 8:13

The "0x" counts towards the eight character count. You need "%#010x".

Note that # does not append the 0x to 0 - the result will be 0000000000 - so you probably actually should just use "0x%08x" anyway.

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+1 for mentioning the reason why # is generally useless. – R.. Feb 6 '13 at 16:51

The %#08X conversion must precede the value with 0X; that is required by the standard. There's no evidence in the standard that the # should alter the behaviour of the 08 part of the specification except that the 0X prefix is counted as part of the length (so you might want/need to use %#010X. If, like me, you like your hex presented as 0x1234CDEF, then you have to use 0x%08X to achieve the desired result. You could use %#.8X and that should also insert the leading zeroes.

Try variations on the following code:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
    int j = 0;
    printf("0x%.8X = %#08X = %#.8X = %#010x\n", j, j, j, j);
    for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
        j = (j << 4) | (i + 6);
        printf("0x%.8X = %#08X = %#.8X = %#010x\n", j, j, j, j);

On an RHEL 5 machine, and also on Mac OS X (10.7.5), the output was:

0x00000000 = 00000000 = 00000000 = 0000000000
0x00000006 = 0X000006 = 0X00000006 = 0x00000006
0x00000067 = 0X000067 = 0X00000067 = 0x00000067
0x00000678 = 0X000678 = 0X00000678 = 0x00000678
0x00006789 = 0X006789 = 0X00006789 = 0x00006789
0x0006789A = 0X06789A = 0X0006789A = 0x0006789a
0x006789AB = 0X6789AB = 0X006789AB = 0x006789ab
0x06789ABC = 0X6789ABC = 0X06789ABC = 0x06789abc
0x6789ABCD = 0X6789ABCD = 0X6789ABCD = 0x6789abcd

I'm a little surprised at the treatment of 0; I'm not clear why the 0X prefix is omitted, but with two separate systems doing it, it must be standard. It confirms my prejudices against the # option.

The treatment of zero is according to the standard.

ISO/IEC 9899:2011 § The fprintf function

¶6 The flag characters and their meanings are:
# The result is converted to an "alternative form". ... For x (or X) conversion, a nonzero result has 0x (or 0X) prefixed to it. ...

(Emphasis added.)

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