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I have a NDB model that exposes a few instance methods to manipulate its state. In some request handlers, I need to call a few of these instance methods. In order to prevent calling put() more than once on the same entity, the pattern I've used so far is similar to this:

class Foo(ndb.Model):
    prop_a = ndb.StringProperty()
    prop_b = ndb.StringProperty()
    prop_c = ndb.StringProperty()

    def some_method_1(self):
        self.prop_a = "The result of some computation"
        return True

    def some_method_2(self):
        if some_condition:
            self.prop_b = "Some new value"
            return True
        return False

    def some_method_3(self):
        if some_condition:
            self.prop_b = "Some new value"
            return True
        if some_other_condition:
            self.prop_b = "Some new value"
            self.prop_c = "Some new value"
            return True
        return False

def manipulate_foo(f):
    updated = False
    updated = f.some_method_1() or updated
    updated = f.some_method_2() or updated
    updated = f.some_method_3() or updated
    if updated:
        f.put()

Basically, each method that can potentially update the entity returns a bool to indicate if the entity has been updated and therefore needs to be saved. When calling these methods in sequence, I make sure to call put() if any of the methods returned True.

However, this pattern can be complex to implement in situations where other subroutines are involved. In that case, I need to make the updated boolean value returned from subroutines bubble up to the top-level methods.

I am now in the process of optimizing a lot of my request handlers, trying to limit as much as possibles the waterfalls reported by AppStat, using as much async APIs as I can and converting a lot of methods to tasklets.

This effort lead me to read the NDB Async documentation, which mentions that NDB implements an autobatcher which combines multiple requests in a single RPC call to the datastore. I understand that this applies to requests involving different keys, but does it also apply to redundant calls to the same entity?

In other words, my question is: could the above code pattern be replaced by this one?

class FooAsync(ndb.Model):
    prop_a = ndb.StringProperty()
    prop_b = ndb.StringProperty()
    prop_c = ndb.StringProperty()

    @ndb.tasklet
    def some_method_1(self):
        self.prop_a = "The result of some computation"
        yield self.put_async()

    @ndb.tasklet
    def some_method_2(self):
        if some_condition:
            self.prop_b = "Some new value"
            yield self.put_async()

    @ndb.tasklet
    def some_method_3(self):
        if some_condition:
            self.prop_b = "Some new value"
            yield self.put_async()
        elif some_other_condition:
            self.prop_b = "Some new value"
            self.prop_c = "Some new value"
            yield self.put_async()

@ndb.tasklet
def manipulate_foo(f):
    yield f.some_method_1()
    yield f.some_method_2()
    yield f.some_method_3()

Would all calls to put_async() be combined into a single put call on the entity? If yes, are there any caveats to using this approach vs sticking to manually checking for an updated return value and calling put once at the end of the call sequence?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Well, I bit the bullet and tested these 3 scenarios in a test GAE application with AppStat enabled to look at what RPC calls were being made:

class Foo(ndb.Model):
    prop_a = ndb.DateTimeProperty()
    prop_b = ndb.StringProperty()
    prop_c = ndb.IntegerProperty()

class ThreePutsHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
    def post(self):
        foo = Foo.get_or_insert('singleton')
        foo.prop_a = datetime.utcnow()
        foo.put()
        foo.prop_b = str(foo.prop_a)
        foo.put()
        foo.prop_c = foo.prop_a.microsecond
        foo.put()

class ThreePutsAsyncHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
    @ndb.toplevel
    def post(self):
        foo = Foo.get_or_insert('singleton')
        foo.prop_a = datetime.utcnow()
        foo.put_async()
        foo.prop_b = str(foo.prop_a)
        foo.put_async()
        foo.prop_c = foo.prop_a.microsecond
        foo.put_async()

class ThreePutsTaskletHandler(webapp2.RequestHandler):
    @ndb.tasklet
    def update_a(self, foo):
        foo.prop_a = datetime.utcnow()
        yield foo.put_async()

    @ndb.tasklet
    def update_b(self, foo):
        foo.prop_b = str(foo.prop_a)
        yield foo.put_async()

    @ndb.tasklet
    def update_c(self, foo):
        foo.prop_c = foo.prop_a.microsecond
        yield foo.put_async()

    @ndb.toplevel
    def post(self):
        foo = Foo.get_or_insert('singleton')
        self.update_a(foo)
        self.update_b(foo)
        self.update_c(foo)

app = webapp2.WSGIApplication([
    ('/ndb-batching/3-puts', ThreePutsHandler),
    ('/ndb-batching/3-puts-async', ThreePutsAsyncHandler),
    ('/ndb-batching/3-puts-tasklet', ThreePutsTaskletHandler),
], debug=True)

The first one, ThreePutsHandler, obviously ends up calling Put 3 times.

ThreePutsHandler AppStat trace

However, the 2 other tests that are calling put_async() end up with a single call to Put:

ThreePutsAsyncHandler AppStat trace ThreePutsTaskletHandler AppStat trace

So the answer to my question is: yes, redundant ndb.Model.put_async() calls are being batched by NDB's autobatching feature and end up as a single datastore_v3.Put call. And it does not matter if those put_async() calls are made within a tasklet or not.

A note about the number of datastore write ops being observed in the test results: as Shay pointed out in the comments, there are 4 writes per modified indexed property value plus 1 write for the entity. So in the first test (3 sequential put), we observe (4+1) * 3 = 15 write ops. In the 2 other tests (async), we observe (4*3) + 1 = 13 write ops.

So the bottom line is that having NDB batch multiple put_async calls for the same entity saves us a lot of latency by having a single call to the datastore, and saves us a few write ops by writing the entity only once.

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Every day you (me) learn something new a about AppEngine, I didn't know about batching (and couldn't find it in the docs) until I found a issue report about it that shed some light on the feature. BTW it does save a lot, latency and writing operation cost wise, it is just that every indexed attribute modified cost you 4 writes (plus one for the put) so your number make sense. –  Shay Erlichmen Feb 7 '13 at 6:04
    
Glad I could open the door to new knowledge! About the 4 writes per attribute: I don't quite understand. My understanding of how datastore writes are performed (developers.google.com/appengine/articles/life_of_write) is that there are 2 indexes per attribute (asc and desc), but I am obviously not getting this right... Could you shed some light? –  Pascal Bourque Feb 7 '13 at 15:37
    
This sounds about right. AFAICR there's some code to collapse multiple get_async() calls for the same key, but not for put_async(). Check ndb/context.py for get_once(). Note it is called by various get() methods but not by put(). –  Guido van Rossum Feb 7 '13 at 16:06
1  
If you look at the billing page you see the each indexed attribute (by default most of the attribute are indexed unless indexed=False specified on the entity) cost "1 write + 4 writes per modified indexed property value + 2 writes per modified composite index value". so in your first case the cost are (4+1)+(4+1)+(4+1) and in the 2nd and 3rd its 3*4 + 1. –  Shay Erlichmen Feb 7 '13 at 16:10
1  
@PascalBourque: they are batched, but not collapsed. Batched means a single RPC with two requests. Collapsed would mean that the RPC contains only a single request. That's what happens for get_async(). –  Guido van Rossum Feb 8 '13 at 15:19

Try annotating the object itself, and checking before returning response. Like the _p_changed attribute in Zope. Another alternative could be a request/threadlocal registry of modified objects that needs to be written before returning. For an example of threadlocal in GAE, check google/appengine/runtime/request_environment.py

share|improve this answer
    
I like your sugestion of annotating the object to know if it needs to be saved! –  Pascal Bourque Feb 7 '13 at 3:47

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