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This is a C assignment. I'm not asking anyone to do this for me, I just have hit a wall. It's due tomorrow and I don't know how to proceed. I'm a beginner and my heads beginning to hurt

Write an ANSI C program which formats a text so that it fits nicely into a given number of columns. The text formatter must right-justify an input text file so the right margins are aligned in a straight line, with one exception. The last line is not right justified. Also, paragraphs are not merged together. The spaces between output lines should be evenly spaced.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

#define IN 1
#define OUT 0

/*
   This is the start of the main pgoram which originated from the K & R word  counter...
   we comment to understand each part...
 */
int main()
{
    /*
     * This is the pointer to the file object we will be readin in
     * from...
     */
    FILE           *ptr_file;
    char           *outputbuf;

    /*
     * This variable will hold the maximum width of the line we are to
     * output
     */
    int width;
    char eatspace;
    char  c;    /* We read each character invidually */

    int   state = OUT;

    int   nc = 0;   /* This is the total count of all words in the document */
    int   nl = 0;   /* This is the total count of newlines in the document  */
    int   nw = 0;  
    int   lw = 0;   /* Count the total whitespaces spaces per line */
    int   buff_offset = 0; /* Keep track of how many letters we are into the current output line */

    /* Opens a file stream for the .txt file to be read in */
    ptr_file = fopen("hollo_man.txt", "r");
    if ((fopen("hollo_man.txt", "r")) != NULL) {
        /*
         * This loop reads in one character at a time until the end
         * of file
         */

        /* Read the first line to get the width of the output */
        fscanf (ptr_file, "%i", &width); 
        outputbuf = (char*) malloc(width + 1);
        //fscanf(ptr_file, "%c", &eatspace);

        int prev_char_was_space = 0;

        while ((c = fgetc(ptr_file)) != EOF)
        {
            ++nc;
            if (c == '\n' || strlen(outputbuf) == width) 
            {
                outputbuf[buff_offset] = '\0';      
                ++nl;
                //              printf("Saw a newline, newline count is now: %i\n", nl);
                /* Our buffer needs to be ended since we saw a newline */

                for(int i = 0; i < (width - buff_offset); i++)
                {
                    printf(" ");

                }
                printf("%s\n", outputbuf);

                memset(outputbuf, width, '\0');

                buff_offset = 0; 
                prev_char_was_space = 0;

            }

            /* This more verbose check is to see if there is other whitespace */
            else if (isspace(c)) 
            {


                /* We only store one space between words in the output, this allows us to easily and evenly pad with white space later */
                if (!prev_char_was_space)
                {

                    outputbuf[buff_offset] = c;
                    outputbuf[buff_offset + 1] = '\0';                  
                    buff_offset++;                  

                    lw++;
                    prev_char_was_space = 1;
                }   
            }
            else /* This was not a whitespace character so store it in the current line buffer */
            {

                prev_char_was_space = 0; /* Keep track that we didnt have a whitespace for the next iteration */
                outputbuf[buff_offset] = c;
                buff_offset++;
                ++nw;


            }

        } /* End reading each character */

        /* This line should indeed print output to console for now */
        //fprintf(stderr, "ORIG LINE COUNT: %d\nORIG WORD COUNT: %d\nORIG CHAR COUNT: %d\n", nl, lw, nc);
        /* Close our file and clean up */
        fclose(ptr_file);
    }

    return 0;
}

All it does is print out a blank line. I think I need another buffer, but I have no idea really. How would I go about printing it and then evenly spacing the words with padded spaces? I am also unsure how to print each line to the assigned width. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

There's the minor issue of the double fopen, that should be cut down to one.

Your file probably has a format something like this:

15
The quick
brown

The problem is that your logic is something like the following:

/* Opens a file stream for the .txt file to be read in */
ptr_file = fopen("hollo_man.txt", "r");
if (/*the file was opened correctly */) {

        Read 'width' from the first word of the file;
        Create a buffer exactly 'width'+1 in size;

        while(get_a_character != EOF) {
            increment_total_character_count;
            if(character_is_newline)
                increment_newline_count;
                insert a '\0' in the output buffer;
                reset the index we're inserting into the output buffer
                prevCharacterIsSpace = false;
            if(character_is_space)
                if(previous_character_NOT_a_space)
                    put_character_in_output_buffer;
                    increment_word_counter;
                    prevCharacterIsSpace = true;
            else
                prevCharacterIsSpace = true;
                put_character_in_output_buffer;
                increment_nw (never used)
        }


        needed_spaces = (width - nc) % lw;
        printf(" %s", outputbuf);

If the input file has the format above, with the width appearing on it's own line, what the character stream you are reading looks like this:

'15' (read as a unit with the %i)
'\n'
'T'
'h'
...
'w'
'n'
'\n'

Your character-reading-loop sees a newline as the very first character. It inserts a null into the output buffer, sets prevCharacterIsSpace to false, and then continues. If your file format does match what I have above, you probably want to fix this by "eating" the '\n' right after reading in 'width'.

Note that the isspace function returns true for newlines, so now the newline is put into the next slot of the output buffer, and the word counter is incremented (if you uncommented that printf at the bottom of the program, you should see that effect). The fix is probably just to make the if (isspace(c)) into else if (isspace(c))

Another problem is that you're copying each seperate line from the file into the same buffer. So there is no way that you can display any more than the last line of the input. You probably need to put your printing code inside the if (c == '\n') { block. This will allow you to print each line as you read it.

None of the code here handles printing right-justified text, but a simple solution for that would be a small loop:

for (i = 0; i < (width - buff_offset); i++)
    printf(" ");

inserted directly before you print your output.

share|improve this answer
    
I went with your advice, and included my changes in the code above. The output is right justified, but it does not print correctly. I'm not exactly sure how to describe the output, it almost looks "patchy". –  freitazm Feb 7 '13 at 1:34

first of all don't call fopen("hollo_man.txt", "r") twice, check the pointer in your if.

then you should read the file in word by word:

char words[1024];
char * next_word = words;
while(fscanf(ptr_file, "%s", next_word) {

count their length

size_t word_length = strlen(next_word);
next_word += word_length + 1;

and when you have reached the necessary width print them:

total_length +=  word_length;
if (total_length > maxColumns) {
     size_t extra_spaces = total_length - word_length - 2;

Does this help?

Here is a complete solution:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void justify(FILE* in, FILE * out, int columns) {
    char words[1024];
    char * next_word = words;

    ssize_t total_length = 0;
    size_t num_words = 0;

    while (fscanf(in, "%s", next_word) == 1) {
        size_t word_length = strlen(next_word);
        next_word += word_length + 1;
        num_words++;
        total_length += word_length;

        if (total_length + num_words > columns) {

            size_t spaces_needed = columns - (total_length - word_length);

            int minspoaces = 1;
            if (num_words > 2) // avoids nasty floating point exception if no two words fit on a line
                minspoaces = spaces_needed / (num_words - 2);


            char * word_print = words;

            size_t chars_printed = fprintf(out, "%s",word_print);
            word_print += strlen(word_print) + 1;
            size_t spaces_printed = 0;
            ssize_t words_to_print = num_words - 2;

            fflush(out);

            while (words_to_print > 0) {
                int spaces_to_print = minspoaces;
                if (((spaces_needed - spaces_printed) % words_to_print) * 2 >= words_to_print) // spreads spaces out along the line
                    spaces_to_print++;
                spaces_printed += spaces_to_print;
                words_to_print--;
                chars_printed += fprintf(out, "%*c%s", spaces_to_print, ' ', word_print);
                word_print += strlen(word_print) + 1;
                fflush(out);
            }
            fprintf(out, "\n");

            memmove(words, word_print, (total_length = strlen(word_print)) + 1);
            num_words = 1;
            next_word = words + total_length + 1;
        }

    }

    char * word_print = words;
    while (word_print != next_word) {
        word_print += fprintf(out, "%s ", word_print);
    }

    fprintf(out, "\n");
}

int main(int argc, char ** argv) {

    int columns = atoi(argv[1]);

    FILE * in = stdin;

    if (argc >= 3 && argv[2]) {
        in = fopen(argv[2], "r");
        if (!in) {
            perror("fopen");
            return -1;
        }
    }

    justify(in, stdout, columns);

}
share|improve this answer
    
When I try assigning total_length += word_length get the following 'error:program1.c:61:23: error: invalid '+=' at end of declaration; did you mean '='? size_t total_length += word_length; –  freitazm Feb 6 '13 at 18:07
    
+= is only valid when changing a value. it means total_length = total_length + word_length. += is invalid in initializers. –  Sergey L. Feb 6 '13 at 18:26
    
thank you so much for all your help! –  freitazm Feb 6 '13 at 22:13

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