Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a django view that looks like...

    def add_user(request):
        if User.objects.get(username__exact = request.POST['username']):
            context = { 'message': "Username already taken"}
            return render_to_response("mytemplate.html", context, RequestContext(request))

        newUser = User(username="freeandclearusername")
        newUser.save()

        #then other code that is related to setting up a new user.

The other code that is related to setting up the user is still ran even if the initial conditional statement fails and the "return render_to_response()" is called.

The page is rendered with the correct context but other information is added to the database after the initial return. I thought that the code after the "return render_to_response()" would not run.

Can anyone confirm or explain this?

UPDATE....

Ok so if I add a conditional....

def add_user(request):
    if User.objects.get(username__exact = request.POST['username']):
        bad_user = True
        context = { 'message': "Username already taken"}
        return render_to_response("mytemplate.html", context, RequestContext(request))

    newUser = User(username="freeandclearusername")
    newUser.save()

    if bad_user != True:
        #then other code that is related to setting up a new user.
        context = { 'message': "Username is great!!!!!"}
        return render_to_response("mytemplate.html", context, RequestContext(request))

This behaves as expected. Also if I remove the RequestConext() it seems to behave correctly as well.

Any ideas? I think the problem lies in how I'm using RequestContext.

share|improve this question
    
render_to_response usually takes a RequestContext as a keyword argument, called "context_instance" i.e. render_to_response("mytemplate.html", context, context_instance=RequestContext(request)) But I don't immediately see how that would affect your code's execution... –  Ryan Duffield Sep 24 '09 at 21:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The return statement will indeed terminate the function. So if you see other code being executed, you either

  • don't execute the return statement, and thus produce the output somehow differently, or
  • have other code (before the function is called, or in a middleware) that makes the database changes.
share|improve this answer

You are correct, assuming your conditions are met, the view will exit on your return statement. The only other thing I can think of that hasn't already been mentioned is indentation -- double-check that you do not have a mix of tabs and spaces. That can sometimes result in the unexpected.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.