Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two tables, users and groups. An user owns a group and can be apart of multiple groups. A group belongs to one user and can have many users.

Thus for my user model I have

has_and_belongs_to_many :groups
has_many :groups

While for my group model I have

has_and_belongs_to_many :users
belongs_to :user

I also have a join table in my migrations..

def change
  create_table :groups_users, :id => false do |t|
    t.integer :group_id
    t.integer :user_id
  end
end

My question is does this make sense? I feel like I'm doing something wrong by having has_many and belongs_to on top of has_and_belongs_to_many.

share|improve this question
    
has_many :groups and belongs_to :user not required –  codeit Feb 6 '13 at 18:48
    
How will I differentiate between the user who owns the group and the group members? –  jason328 Feb 6 '13 at 18:55
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The way I would approach this, and this is my own personal methodology, is with 3 tables/models like so:

group_user.rb

class GroupUser < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :user_id, :group_id

  belongs_to :group
  belongs_to :user
end

group.rb

class Group < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :owner_id

  validates_presence_of :owner_id

  has_many :group_users
  has_many :users, through: :group_users
end

user.rb

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :some_attributes

  has_many :group_users
  has_many :groups, through: :group_users
end

Then, whenever you create a Group object, the User that created it would have its id placed in the owner_id attribute of Group and itself into the GroupUser table.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. –  jason328 Feb 6 '13 at 19:13
add comment

Another option, so as to not have multiple foreign keys pointing to the same relationship, is to use a join model and then add a flag on the join model to denote if the user is the owner.

For example:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :memberships
  has_many :groups, through: :memberships
  has_many :owned_groups, through: memberships, conditions: ["memberships.owner = ?", true], class_name: "Group"
end

class Membership < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :group

  #This model contains a boolean field called owner
  #You would create a unique constraint on owner, group and user
end

class Group < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :memberships
  has_many :users, through: :memberships
  has_one :owner, through: :memberships, conditions: ["memberships.owner = ?", true], class_name: "User"
end
share|improve this answer
    
Since you were the first to post, I'll give you credit. Thanks for the answer. –  jason328 Feb 6 '13 at 19:07
    
Thanks, but I believe that Leo Correa answered first. –  Sean Hill Feb 6 '13 at 19:07
    
Ahh that he did. I'll change the answers then. –  jason328 Feb 6 '13 at 19:10
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.