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I have a class GenericNode which is inherited by ValueNode and OperatorNode. OR_Node inherits OperatorNode.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

template< typename T_Value >
class GenericNode
 {
public: 
GenericNode() {} ;
virtual ~GenericNode() {} ;
// virtual T_Value evaluate() { std::cout << "BAD I'm abstract, who call me?" << std::endl ;} ;
virtual T_Value evaluate() = 0 ;
} ;

template< typename T_Value >
class ValueNode : public GenericNode<T_Value>
{
public:
ValueNode() {} ;
ValueNode( T_Value arg0 )
{
    this->aValue = arg0 ;
}
void setValue( T_Value arg0 )
{
    this->aValue = arg0 ;
}
~ValueNode() {} ;
 protected: 
T_Value aValue ;
public: 
virtual T_Value evaluate()
{
    return this->aValue ;
}
 } ;

 template< typename T_Value >
class OperatorNode : public GenericNode<T_Value>
{
public:
OperatorNode() {} ;

OperatorNode( GenericNode<T_Value>* arg0 , GenericNode<T_Value>* arg1 )
{
    std::cout << "aValue: " << arg0->evaluate() << std::endl ;
    std::cout << "aValue: " << arg1->evaluate() << std::endl ;
    this->left = arg0 ;
    this->right = arg1 ;
    std::cout << "aValue: " << this->left->evaluate() << std::endl ;
    std::cout << "aValue: " << this->right->evaluate() << std::endl ;
}
virtual T_Value evaluate() { std::cout << "BAD I'm abstract OperatorNode, who call me?" << std::endl ;} ;
virtual ~OperatorNode() {} ;
//protected:    
GenericNode<T_Value>* left ;
GenericNode<T_Value>* right ;

} ;

template< typename T_Value >
class OR_Node : public OperatorNode<T_Value>
{
public:
~OR_Node() {} ;
OR_Node( GenericNode<T_Value> *arg0 , GenericNode<T_Value> *arg1 )
{
    OperatorNode<T_Value>( arg0 , arg1 ) ;
}
public: 
virtual T_Value evaluate()
{
    std::cout << "ok here " << std::endl ;

    std::cout << "-> " << this->left->evaluate() << std::endl ;

    //return this->left->evaluate() + this->right->evaluate() ;
}
} ;
int main()
 {
 std::vector< GenericNode< int >* > myVec ;
 ValueNode<int> One , Two , Three , Four , Five ;
 One.setValue( 1 ) ;
 Two.setValue( 2 ) ;
 Three.setValue( 3 ) ;
 Four.setValue( 4 ) ;
 Five.setValue( 5 ) ;
 OR_Node<int> orOne( &Three , &Four ) ;

 //std::cout << "----> " << orOne.evaluate() << std::endl ;
 myVec.push_back( &orOne ) ;

 myVec.push_back( &One ) ;
 myVec.push_back( &Two ) ;
 myVec.push_back( &Three ) ;
 myVec.push_back( &Four ) ;
 myVec.push_back( &Five ) ;


// ValueNode< int > aVN( 1 ) ;
   while (!myVec.empty())
    {
        std::cout << "-> " << myVec.back()->evaluate() << std::endl ;
        myVec.pop_back();
    }



return 0 ;
}

The output is:

aValue: 3
aValue: 4
aValue: 3
aValue: 4
-> 5
-> 4
-> 3
-> 2
-> 1
ok here 
Segfault

I do not understand why the line of code:

std::cout << "aValue: " << this->left->evaluate() << std::endl ;

works fine, and the line

std::cout << "-> " << this->left->evaluate() << std::endl ;

produces a segfault.

Thanks! :D

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1  
How about producing an SSCCE? –  Andy Prowl Feb 6 '13 at 18:51
    
are right or left pointing to values that have been popped off of myVec? Popped objects are deleted so accessing them would segfault –  cppguy Feb 6 '13 at 18:59
    
@AndyProwl yeah, how can I produce it? That code can be copied and pasted in a main.cpp and gcc main.cpp -o main.exec. Can I put on something like pastebin? –  alevax Feb 6 '13 at 18:59
    
@cppguy yeah, but If you decomment the line //std::cout << "----> " << orOne.evaluate() << std::endl ; The segfault comes without accessing the vector, but only in the evaluate() –  alevax Feb 6 '13 at 19:01
    
You may want to actually return values from those members. I'd start with that. virtual T_Value evaluate() { std::cout << "BAD I'm abstract OperatorNode, who call me?" << std::endl ;}; for example, doesn't return anything, so heaven knows what is one the stack to destroy. –  WhozCraig Feb 6 '13 at 19:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
OR_Node( GenericNode<T_Value> *arg0 , GenericNode<T_Value> *arg1 )
{
    OperatorNode<T_Value>( arg0 , arg1 ) ;
}

This code:

  1. Calls the default constructor of base class OperatorNode<T_Value>
  2. Constructs another temporary object of type OperatorNode<T_Value>, passing arg0 and arg1 to it.
  3. Discards that temporary.

So the members of the OperatorNode<T_Value> within the OR_Node<T_Value> are still uninitialized pointers.

The correct way to initialize a base class subobject is using a member initializer list:

OR_Node( GenericNode<T_Value> *arg0 , GenericNode<T_Value> *arg1 )
    : OperatorNode( arg0, arg1 )
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
also, if this were actually pure virtual, the OR_Node constructor would've triggered a compilation error: virtual T_Value evaluate() = 0; –  Tim Feb 6 '13 at 19:22
    
Ok, This solved my segfault. Thanks for the explanation. Thank to all guys ;) –  alevax Feb 7 '13 at 10:37

I agree with GHL, you are trying to pop an empty stack. Trying checking the stack to see if it is empty first and if it does turn up empty throw an exception or exit.

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