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Lets say I have the following code:
Mocked object class

public class SomeClass {
    private Foo someField;
    public SomeClass {
        someField = new Foo();
    }
    public Foo getSomeField { return someField; }
    public void getSomething() {}
    public boolean doSomething(Object object) {}
}

Next I have test suite

public class TestSuite {
    private ClassToTest classToTest;
    private SomeClass mock;

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
        classToTest = new ClassToTest();
        mock = EasyMock.createMock(SomeClass.class);
    }

    @Test
    public void testMethod() throws Exception { 
        mock.getSomething();
        EasyMock.replay(mock);

        classToTest.methodToTest(mock); //Where methodToTest accepts SomeClass and int

        EasyMock.verify(mock);
    }
}

And method which is being tested

public void methodToTest(SomeClass a) {
    //Logic here
    Foo b = a.getSomeField();
    b.do(); // <--- null pointer exception here because someField isn't initialized
    a.getSomething(); // <--- thing I want to test if it is being called, but can't due to exception prior to this line
    //Logic after
}

I am stuck.. So yea basically SomeClass isn't initialized like I wanted to. Is there any workaround? Or maybe any other frameworks which can do something like that?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your methodToTest calls a.getSomeField(), but the setup part of your test doesn't expect that call. You want something like:

Foo foo = new Foo();
EasyMock.expect(mock.getSomeField()).andReturn(foo);

Or to stub the call:

Foo foo = new Foo();
EasyMock.expect(mock.getSomeField()).andStubReturn(foo);

(before your call to mock.getSomething()).

See this question for the differences between andReturn and andStubReturn.

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You are right I forgot to test it, too. But that is not the case. Problem is that you can see my constructor initializes someField and when I am making mock, that someField is null and as a result whole methodToTest breaks. So that means constructor isn't getting called? –  SomeRandomUser56789 Feb 6 '13 at 20:04
    
@su234fk234hawuhsafklsfjs: What your normal implementation does is irrelevant. You're mocking that class, so its behaviour doesn't matter. So long as you mock the call you're making on to so that getSomeField() returns a non-null reference, it's fine. –  Jon Skeet Feb 6 '13 at 20:08
    
But the problem is that getSomeField(); does return null, because SomeClass initializes someField nothing else also there isn't a setter. I don't understand how can test pass if NPE is thrown by b.do(); –  SomeRandomUser56789 Feb 6 '13 at 21:07
    
@su234fk234hawuhsafklsfjs: It won't return null if you tell EasyMock to return something different though. That's the point of the code in my answer. Have you tried this solution yet? –  Jon Skeet Feb 6 '13 at 21:18
    
Ah right, now I get it, thanks I will try it and inform you tomorrow –  SomeRandomUser56789 Feb 6 '13 at 21:39
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