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I wrote some python code that makes heavy use of the pandas library. The code seems to be a bit slow, so I ran it through cProfile to see where the bottlenecks are. One of the the bottlenecks according to the cProfile results is the call to pandas.lib_scalar_compare:

1604  262.301    0.164  262.301    0.164 {pandas.lib.scalar_compare}

My question is this - under what circumstances does this get called ? I assume its when I do selecting of part of a DataFrame. Here is what my code looks like:

if (var=='9999'):
    dataTable=resultTable.ix[(resultTable['col1'] == var1)  
                                             & (resultTable['col2']==var2)].copy() 
else:
    dataTable=resultTable.ix[(resultTable['col1'] == var1)  
                                           & (resultTable['col2']==var2)
                                           & (resultTable['col3']==int(val3))].copy() 

I have the following questions: 1. Is that the code snippet that eventually calls the code that causes the bottleneck? 2. If so, is there anyway to optimize this? The version of pandas I am currently using is pandas-0.8.

Any help on this would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
The .copy() doesn't do anything in this case, leaving that off speeds up slightly. Presumably this isn't your entire code... –  Andy Hayden Feb 6 '13 at 20:17
    
I'm not sure how big your dataframes are, but you could unstack ResultTable and access it with a multiindex tuple –  Zelazny7 Feb 6 '13 at 20:27
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1 Answer

You could set the index using the columns col1-col3. Here's a toy example:

In [1]: df = DataFrame(np.arange(20).reshape(5,4))

In [2]: df
Out[2]:
    0   1   2   3
0   0   1   2   3
1   4   5   6   7
2   8   9  10  11
3  12  13  14  15
4  16  17  18  19

In [3]: df2 = df.set_index(keys=[0,1,2])

In [4]: df2
Out[4]:
           3
0  1  2
0  1  2    3
4  5  6    7
8  9  10  11
12 13 14  15
16 17 18  19

MultiIndex tuple:

In [5]: %timeit df2.ix[(4,5,6)]
10000 loops, best of 3: 99.5 us per loop

Original DataFrame:

In [6]: %timeit df.ix[(df[0]==4) & (df[1]==5) & (df[2]==6)][3]
1000 loops, best of 3: 515 us per loop

UPDATE: Addressing duplicate indices

In [1]: df = DataFrame(np.arange(20).reshape(5,4))

In [2]: df = concat([df, df])

In [3]: df
Out[3]:
    0   1   2   3
0   0   1   2   3
1   4   5   6   7
2   8   9  10  11
3  12  13  14  15
4  16  17  18  19
0   0   1   2   3
1   4   5   6   7
2   8   9  10  11
3  12  13  14  15
4  16  17  18  19

This fails:

In [4]: df2 = df.set_index(keys=[0,1,2])

In [5]: df2.ix[(0,1,2)]

KeyError: u'no item named 1'

This works:

In [6]: df2 = df.set_index(keys=[0,1,2]).sort()

In [7]: df2.ix[(0,1,2)]
Out[7]:
       3
0 1 2
0 1 2  3
    2  3
share|improve this answer
    
I was a little surprised this was so much faster, but I guess I shouldn't be... :) –  Andy Hayden Feb 6 '13 at 21:08
    
Ok, I'll take a look at this, thanks a lot. –  femibyte Feb 7 '13 at 1:50
    
The MultiIndex approach only works as a unique index - if I just wanted to select a bunch of rows that meet a certain criterion I have to use the Boolean approach. Thanks –  femibyte Feb 8 '13 at 4:45
    
If you sort the dataframe this will work. See my edited response. –  Zelazny7 Feb 8 '13 at 15:34
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