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I have the following tables:

items (item_id (PRIMARY), item_name)
activity (activity_id (PRIMARY), item_id (INT), user_id (INT), lat (FLOAT), lng (FLOAT), created_at)

I'd like to do the following query:

SELECT
  i.item_id,
  i.item_name,
  count(distint a.user_id) as total_count
FROM activity as a
  INNER JOIN item as i
    on a.item_id = i.item_id
WHERE (a.lat BETWEEN XXXXXXX
       and XXXXXXX
       and a.lng BETWEEN XXXXXXX
       and XXXXXXX)
    and created_at >= DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 5 DAY)
GROUP by a.bid
ORDER BY RAND()
LIMIT 5

This is a heavy query on a 3-5 million record table, even though I have the index on activity:

item_index (item_id, lat, lng, created_at)

This doesn't get used in the EXPLAIN, it just defaults to "item_id". I guess what I'm asking is - what indexes need to be added to make this query run fast or is there an optimization I can make?

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2 Answers 2

Try a derieved subquery like this

SELECT
  i.item_id,
  i.item_name,
  count(distint a.user_id) as total_count
FROM activity as a
  INNER JOIN (select
        item_id,
        item_name
          from item
          where a.lat BETWEEN XXXXXXX
          and XXXXXXX
          and a.lng BETWEEN XXXXXXX
          and XXXXXXX) as i
    on a.item_id = i.item_id
WHERE created_at >= DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 5 DAY)
GROUP by a.bid
ORDER BY RAND()
LIMIT 5
share|improve this answer

The index could be used for either the where clause, the on clause, or both.

In a where clause, an index on columns A, B, and C (in that order), can be used in the following circumstances:

  • Equality on A eg (A = a)
  • Ordered comparison on A (eg A < a or A > a)
  • Equality on A and B (eg A = a and B = b)
  • Equality on A, ordered comparison on B (eg A = a and B < b)
  • Equality on A and B and C
  • Equality on A and B and ordered comparison on C

Your where clause has equality and then two ordered comparisons. I would suggest changing the a.lng from a between to an in and to change the index to item_index (item_id, lng, lat, created_at).

You should also remove the index on item_index(item_id) since it is not needed. This new index can be used anywhere that one can be.

Because of the order by rand(), this query has to generate the entire result set before returning any rows. The only way to really improve the performance is by hoping that the where conditions are highly selective, so they reduce the size of the generated set.

You may be better off if you can structure the query to take 5 rows from activity or item and then do the joins.

share|improve this answer
    
I wasn't aware you could change BETWEEN to IN? Also where are you getting user_name? –  gregavola Feb 7 '13 at 22:46
    
The change of between to in was just a guess. a.lng seemed like "language" which seems discrete, but could be something else. user_name is my mistake . . . I misread item_name. –  Gordon Linoff Feb 7 '13 at 23:02

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