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I would like to run a windows command line command from java and return the result into java. Is this possible?

for example, I would like to do the following

Object returnValue = runOnCommandLine("wmic cpu get LoadPercentage"); //In this case, returnValue is the cpu load percent as a String

Edit: I was able to get this working

InputStream inputStream = new ProcessBuilder("wmic", "cpu", "get", "status").start().getInputStream();
StringWriter writer = new StringWriter();
IOUtils.copy(inputStream, writer);
String theString = writer.toString();
System.out.println("My string: " + theString);
share|improve this question
    
It take a look at this and this and this – MadProgrammer Feb 6 '13 at 20:44
    
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Data you need is commandOutput.

    String cmd = "wmic cpu get LoadPercentage";
    ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder(cmd);
    pb.redirectErrorStream(true);
    Process p = pb.start();
    BufferedReader stdin = new BufferedReader(
                          new InputStreamReader(p.getInputStream()));
    StringBuilder commandOutput = new StringBuilder();
    String line;
    while ((line = stdin.readLine()) != null) {
      commandOutput.append(line);
    }
    int exitValue = -1;
    try {
     exitValue = p.waitFor();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
    // do something here   
    }
share|improve this answer

You could do the following:

        Process proc = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("net start");          
        InputStreamReader isr = new InputStreamReader(proc.getInputStream());
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(isr);

        String temp = null;
        while (( temp = br.readLine() ) != null)
               System.out.println(temp);
share|improve this answer

Take a look into ProcessBuilder.

Below Java 1.5 Runtime.getRuntime().exec(...) was used.

share|improve this answer
2  
Much easier to use ProcessBuilder - solves many of the common mistakes people make with Runtime#exec - IMHO – MadProgrammer Feb 6 '13 at 20:38
    
@MadProgrammer It appears Oracle says the same thing in the docs. ProcessBuilder is preferred in 1.5 and above. Thanks for the info. – thatidiotguy Feb 6 '13 at 20:40
    
Please edit your answer accordingly – qkrijger May 21 '14 at 15:27

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