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I'm working on a project where inside a loop I need to make multiple JSON calls. As soon as I exit that loop I need to work with the results of all the calls I made. I'm having a hard time understanding how to make these calls in such a way that my order of operation works out. My code to work with the results always executes before the calls to the service have completed. I created a jsfiddle to demonstrate and am including the code here.

http://jsfiddle.net/VEkrf/3/

    var sourceData = { "fooIndex": "foo",
        "barIndex": "bar"
    }
    var destinationData = {};
    for (var sourceIndex in sourceData) {
        $.getJSON('http://echo.jsontest.com/' + sourceIndex + '/' + sourceData[sourceIndex] + '?callback=?', null, function (result) {
            for (var resultIndex in result) {
                alert("Adding " + resultIndex + " : " + result[resultIndex]);
                destinationData[resultIndex] = result[resultIndex];
            }
        });
    }

    if (Object.keys(destinationData).length == 0) {
        alert("Destination not yet populated");
    }
    else {
        alert("Eureka!  You did it!");
    }
share|improve this question
5  
Don't use synchronous AJAX. It's extremely slow, especially when you make several ones. Instead count the number of requests finished and do something on the last one. –  Jan Dvorak Feb 6 '13 at 20:53
    
In my case the service I'm working with can only process 10 records at a time. I'm taking groups of 100+ records, regrouping then in groups of 10 and sending the requests out. When I get the responses I need to know was it the first, second or third request so I can match the results to the source data. The service has no way of sending along a key so I can match the result back to it's original record. I can't think of any better way to approach this than synchronously. –  Troy Feb 6 '13 at 21:09
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This looks like a job for jQuery Deferred Object, and my sidekick $.when!

Pass all the $.getJSON calls to $.when, and when they are all done, I'll will call a function with all the results.

Check this out:

var sourceData = {
    "fooIndex": "foo",
    "barIndex": "bar"
};
var destinationData = {};

// Array of AJAX calls
var AJAX = [];

for (var sourceIndex in sourceData) {
    AJAX.push($.getJSON('http://echo.jsontest.com/' + sourceIndex + '/' + sourceData[sourceIndex] + '?callback=?'));
}

// Apply is needed to pass each element as a parameter
$.when.apply($, AJAX).done(function(){
    // This function will be called when all the AJAX calls are done

    // The arguments of the functin are the responses from each request
    for(var i = 0, len = AJAX.length; i < len; i++){
        var result = arguments[i][0];
        //arguments: [resultObj, 'success', jqXHR]
        for (var resultIndex in result) {
            alert("Adding " + resultIndex + " : " + result[resultIndex]);
            destinationData[resultIndex] = result[resultIndex];
        }
    }

    alert("Eureka!  You did it!");
});

NOTE: Since this is asynchronous, destinationData won't be available until the callback is triggered. Put any code that uses that inside the .done() callback.

share|improve this answer
    
I have read a lot about differed but I have never been able to successfully implement it. This is a nice example. –  Pow-Ian Feb 6 '13 at 21:09
    
@Pow-Ian: When I first saw it, I was struggling with it too. It's not too bad once you get to know it. –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 6 '13 at 21:10
2  
@Pow-Ian: It can be a bit confusing. All AJAX methods in jQuery now return "promise" objects. Those promises have a .done() method, that is called when it's done. Promises can be combined with $.when() which itself returns promise (which has a .done() method). You can also create your own promise objects with var d = new $.Deferred, and call the d.resolveWith() method on that new deferred once you're done. –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 6 '13 at 21:21
1  
@Troy: Yes, it will. :-) The arguments in the done() method will be in the same order as how they are passed to $.when (meaning arguments[1] will be the 2nd AJAX request). Here's an example, notice the order of the alerts compared to the order of sourceData: jsfiddle.net/Sb7PC –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 6 '13 at 21:25
1  
@Pow-Ian: Hey, if your solution works, stick with it! :-) –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 6 '13 at 21:41
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Since you are using jQuery already I suggest exploring the queue functions. You can queue the ajax calls and then in the success handlers call the de-queue or next function. this way they go in succession. The last item you add to the queue is your function that handles the returned data.

var sourceData = {
    "fooIndex": "foo",
    "barIndex": "bar"
};
var destinationData = {};

$(function () {
    console.debug('ready');
    for (var sourceIndex in sourceData) {
        console.debug('for Loop');
        $(document).queue('ajax', function (next) {
            $.getJSON('http://echo.jsontest.com/' + sourceIndex + '/' + sourceData[sourceIndex] + '?callback=?', null, function (result) {
                for (var resultIndex in result) {
                    alert("Adding " + resultIndex + " : " + result[resultIndex]);
                    destinationData[resultIndex] = result[resultIndex];
                    next();
                }
            });
        });
    }

    $(document).queue('ajax', function (next) {
        alert("Eureka!  You did it!");
    });
    $(document).dequeue('ajax');
});

I do this all the time for 'synchronus' ajax.

here is an example of what i am talking about

share|improve this answer
    
Before I learned how to use jQuery Deferred, this would be the method I would use. :-) –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 6 '13 at 21:15
    
Same thing I normally did, until I took the time to learn deferred (feels almost like using caolan/async in node); when you have a static "queue" of things to send. For a dynamic "queue" of calls I generally will use $().queue still. –  Chad Feb 7 '13 at 14:14
1  
but what if your success and error handlers are not static? How would you do that with deferred? would you be able to assign multiple done handlers or would you have to pass your success functions into deferred? Does jQuery execute all the procedures at once and only trigger 'done' when they all complete? In that case what happens when the second function passed to deferred requires information that is only available after the first function has completed? –  Pow-Ian Feb 7 '13 at 14:20
    
@Pow-Ian: Pretty sure deferreds run all the functions at the same time, and then calls .done when they are all finished. If you need info from one function in the other, then the queue might be your method. –  Rocket Hazmat Feb 7 '13 at 14:28
    
I'm not really sure which is a "better" solution based on the discussions. Yours worked too in fiddle, but I ended up implementing Hazmat's. Thank you very much for your help. –  Troy Feb 7 '13 at 20:36
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