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I need to match certain parts of a string using regex and am having a terrible time trying to figure it out. The string in question will always look like this:

CN=Last.First.M.1234567890, OU=OrganizationalUnit, O=Organization, C=CountryName

The resulting string will look like CN=1234567890, so I need to just get the first part of the string up to and including the , and strip out the Last.First.M. part. Can this be done?

Note: I am passing this regex into a function which I cannot touch, so I cannot use easier methods such as splitting the string or getting just the digits and adding the CN= to it.

Thanks.

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marked as duplicate by jlordo, Troy Alford, Pavel Anossov, Doorknob 冰, Steven Penny Feb 8 '13 at 2:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What language or tool are you using? –  squiguy Feb 6 '13 at 21:15
2  
What parameters does this function take exactly, and what does it return? –  Tim Pietzcker Feb 6 '13 at 21:16
    
@squiguy I am using java –  James Feb 6 '13 at 21:17
    
@TimPietzcker The function takes a String value and returns a Pattern from the java.util.regex.Pattern class. –  James Feb 6 '13 at 21:19
    
What do you mean by that it will always look like that? I'm guessing that you mean that it will always be of the form 'CN=***, OU=***, O=***, C=***', but that the *** can be any other text? –  steinar Feb 6 '13 at 21:21

3 Answers 3

Here's something I do when I'm to lazy to play around with regex.

String[] myStrings = "CN=Last.First.M.1234567890, OU=OrganizationalUnit, O=Organization, C=CountryName"
    .split(",");
// myStrings [0] now contains CN=Last.First.M.1234567890

myStrings[0] = myStrings[0].replace("Last.First.M.", "");
// now we replaced the stuff we didnt want with nothing and myStrings[0]
// is looking pretty nice. This is a lot more readable but probably
// performs worse. For even more readable code assign to variables rather then to modify myStrings[0]
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Sorry missed the part that you couldn't cheat. Other answers are better for you! –  Karl Kildén Feb 6 '13 at 21:29
    
No problem, thanks for the input though! –  James Feb 6 '13 at 21:30

I believe I found the answer to what I am looking for here after doing more digging.

Regular expression to skip character in capture group

All answers here were great, just didn't apply to what I was working on. Now I will work on a different method to solve this. Thanks for all the assistance.

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With the regexp ([A-Z]{2})=(?:\w+\.)+(\d+), you can obtain the parts that you want.

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1  
This matches the whole CN=Last.First.M.1234567890, rather than just selecting CN=1234567890, when I tried it using regexr.com?33mcn –  Ryan Gates Feb 6 '13 at 21:45
    
it captures two groups: CN and 123456789. Then one should just use a variation of @aleroot solution like m.group(1) + "=" + m.group(2) –  Cyrille Ka Feb 6 '13 at 21:59
    
The OP stated that I am passing this regex into a function which I cannot touch, so I cannot use easier methods such as splitting the string or getting just the digits and adding the CN= to it. So I believe concatenating the groups won't work for this. –  Ryan Gates Feb 7 '13 at 17:07

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