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Might be I am missing something obvious.
I have a native class with set and get method.

class DBStorage extends NativeClass{
  public function get($key);
  public function set($key,value);
}

I would like to use that most of the time, but, if I turn on the system DEBUG flag.
I would like the set and get methods to be overloaded with the following:

IF DEBUG IS ON{
    class DBStorage extends NativeClass{
      public function get($key){
         var_dump($key);
         parent::get($key);
      }
      public function set($key,$value){
         var_dump($key,$value);
         parent::set($key,$value);
      }
    }
}

NativeClass is written in C. It is an extension (phpredis, but it is not relevant). How would I accomplish this? I am on the 5.3 branch of PHP.

just to make sure...if debug is off, DBStorage will be:

 class DBStorage extends NativeClass{}

if debug is on, it will be:

class DBStorage extends NativeClass{
      public function get($key){
         var_dump($key);
         parent::get($key);
      }
      public function set($key,$value){
         var_dump($key,$value);
         parent::set($key,$value);
      }
    }

I do try to avoid the cluttring of IFs (there are dozens of functions in the real class)

public function get($key) {
       if (DEBUG) {
           var_dump($key);
       }
       return parent::get($key);
   }
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You can't conditionally overload, but you can conditionally do something in the overloaded method:

class DBStorage extends NativeClass{

    public function get($key) {
       if (DEBUG) {
           var_dump($key);
       }
       return parent::get($key);
    }

}

If debug is off, it passes the arguments right through to the parent method and returns the parent's return value, as if nothing happened.

share|improve this answer
    
Ill edit my question, I try to avoid this solution. –  Itay Moav -Malimovka Feb 6 '13 at 21:20

Your initial code won't compile, because of the if around the class construct. Why not just make available a debug member variable, and if true, echo output, or push into a log file?

class NativeClass
{
    public $debug = false;
}

class DBStorage extends NativeClass
{
    public function get($key)
    {
        if (true === $this->debug) {
            error_log(sprintf('Key: %s', $key));
        }

        parent::get($key);
    }
}

// Calling code
$dbo = new DBStorage();

$dbo->debug = true;

$dbo->doStuff();
share|improve this answer
    
I know it won't comile, it is pseudo code to show what I try to achieve. As for your suggestion, while it will obviously work, is not what I try to do here (see last comment in my question) –  Itay Moav -Malimovka Feb 6 '13 at 21:22
    
So you want to conditionally check if in debug mode, without the conditions? –  Mike Purcell Feb 6 '13 at 21:25
    
yep - see above what I came up with. –  Itay Moav -Malimovka Feb 6 '13 at 21:26
    
Ok, so you want to duplicate an entire class (or methods) for which you want debugging info, to avoid using multiple conditionals? –  Mike Purcell Feb 6 '13 at 21:29
    
The original class is in C, My none debug class is only adding methods. I want to attach output to logs, only in the debug class, to each of the data manipulation methods, which exists only in the original class. –  Itay Moav -Malimovka Feb 6 '13 at 21:32
up vote 0 down vote accepted

something just came to me

class nodebug extends NativeClass{
  static public function create(){
        if(DEBUG) return new DebugNativeClass;
        return new self;
  }
}

class DebugNativeClass extends nodebug{
    public function set($key,$value){
       var_dump($key,$value);
       parent::set($key,$value);
    }

    public function get($key){
       var_dump($key);
       return parent::set($key);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Ya I wouldn't suggest this. For the record, classes containing factory methods should NOT be part of the object being instantiated. The idea of extending from a debug class is also not a great idea, as it limits the ability to extend from a better, more concrete class in the future. –  Mike Purcell Jul 8 '13 at 16:41

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