Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If we have his data recentely used here:

data <- data.frame(name = rep(letters[1:3], each = 3), 
                   var1 = rep(1:9), var2 = rep(3:5, each = 3))

  name var1 var2
1    a    1    3
2    a    2    3
3    a    3    3
4    b    4    4
5    b    5    4
6    b    6    4
7    c    7    5
8    c    8    5
9    c    9    5

we can look for rows where var2 == 4.

data[data[,3] == 4 ,] # equally data[data$var2 == 4 ,]

#  name var1 var2
#4    b    4    4
#5    b    5    4
#6    b    6    4

or rows where both var1 and var2 ==4

data[data[,2] == 4 &  data[,3] == 4,]

#  name var1 var2
#4    b    4    4

what I dont get is why this:

data[ data[ , 2:3 ] == 4 ,]

gives this:

     name var1 var2
4       b    4    4
NA   <NA>   NA   NA
NA.1 <NA>   NA   NA
NA.2 <NA>   NA   NA

#I would still hope to get 
 #  name var1 var2
#4    b    4    4

Where do the NAs come from?

share|improve this question
    
I think thats a rough downvote. –  user1322296 Feb 6 '13 at 21:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your data[,2:3]==4 is the following :

R> data[,2:3]==4
       var1  var2
 [1,] FALSE FALSE
 [2,] FALSE FALSE
 [3,] FALSE FALSE
 [4,]  TRUE  TRUE
 [5,] FALSE  TRUE
 [6,] FALSE  TRUE
 [7,] FALSE FALSE
 [8,] FALSE FALSE
 [9,] FALSE FALSE

Then you try to index the rows of your data frame with this matrix. To do this, R seems to first convert your matrix to a vector :

R> as.vector(data[,2:3]==4)
 [1] FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
[12] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE

It then selects the rows of data based on this vector. The 4th TRUE value selects the 4th row, but the three others TRUE values select "out of bounds" rows, so they return NA's.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 this totally clears it! –  user1322296 Feb 6 '13 at 21:32

Your logical that you're subsetting on is a matrix:

> sel <- data[ , 2:3 ] == 4
> sel
       var1  var2
 [1,] FALSE FALSE
 [2,] FALSE FALSE
 [3,] FALSE FALSE
 [4,]  TRUE  TRUE
 [5,] FALSE  TRUE
 [6,] FALSE  TRUE
 [7,] FALSE FALSE
 [8,] FALSE FALSE
 [9,] FALSE FALSE

According to help("[.data.frame"):

Matrix indexing (x[i] with a logical or a 2-column integer matrix i) using [ is not recommended, and barely supported. For extraction, x is first coerced to a matrix. For replacement, a logical matrix (only) can be used to select the elements to be replaced in the same way as for a matrix.

But that implies this form:

> data[ sel ]
[1] "b" "4" "5" "6" "4"

Badness. What you're doing is even less sensical, though, in that you're telling it you want only the rows (with your trailing comma), and then giving it a matrix to index on!

> data[sel,]
     name var1 var2
4       b    4    4
NA   <NA>   NA   NA
NA.1 <NA>   NA   NA
NA.2 <NA>   NA   NA

If you really wanted to use the matrix form, you could use apply to apply a logical operation across rows.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks for the clarification, I knew it was the wrong way I just didn't know why. Also I know help but hope you realise help("[.data.frame") might be a bit obscure to the uninitiated. –  user1322296 Feb 6 '13 at 21:34
    data[ data[ , 2 ] == 4 | data[,3] == 4,]

    name  var1 var2
 4    b    4    4
 5    b    5    4
 6    b    6    4

I suspect your method does not work because c() builds a vector, whereas you need to compare the atomic elements.

share|improve this answer

Because you're not passing a vector but a matrix to the index:

> data[ , 2:3 ] == 4
       var1  var2
 [1,] FALSE FALSE
 [2,] FALSE FALSE
 [3,] FALSE FALSE
 [4,]  TRUE  TRUE
 [5,] FALSE  TRUE
 [6,] FALSE  TRUE
 [7,] FALSE FALSE
 [8,] FALSE FALSE
 [9,] FALSE FALSE

If you want the matrix collapsed into a vector that indexing works with here are two options:

data[ apply(data[ , 2:3 ] == 4, 1, all) ,]
data[ rowSums(data[ , 2:3 ] == 4) == 2 ,]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.