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I have a program that uses the mt19937 random number generator from boost::random. I need to do a random_shuffle and want the random numbers generated for this to be from this shared state so that they can be deterministic with respect to the mersenne twister's previously generated numbers.

I tried something like this:

void foo(std::vector<unsigned> &vec, boost::mt19937 &state)
{
    struct bar {
        boost::mt19937 &_state;
        unsigned operator()(unsigned i) {
            boost::uniform_int<> rng(0, i - 1);
            return rng(_state);
        }
        bar(boost::mt19937 &state) : _state(state) {}
    } rand(state);

    std::random_shuffle(vec.begin(), vec.end(), rand);
}

But i get a template error calling random_shuffle with rand. However this works:

unsigned bar(unsigned i)
{
    boost::mt19937 no_state;
    boost::uniform_int<> rng(0, i - 1);
    return rng(no_state);
}
void foo(std::vector<unsigned> &vec, boost::mt19937 &state)
{
    std::random_shuffle(vec.begin(), vec.end(), bar);
}

Probably because it is an actual function call. But obviously this doesn't keep the state from the original mersenne twister. What gives? Is there any way to do what I'm trying to do without global variables?

share|improve this question
    
Once you test it out, could you please post the correct code, for posterity? Thanks –  Robert Gould Sep 29 '08 at 3:39
    
Greg: I've reverted your change. You never have to escape HTML characters in your code, if you're willing to use Markdown code blocks (indent each line 4 spaces). –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 29 '08 at 3:43
    
Just highlight the code, and click the "010 101" button. –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 29 '08 at 3:44
    

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In C++03, you cannot instantiate a template based on a function-local type. If you move the rand class out of the function, it should work fine (disclaimer: not tested, there could be other sinister bugs).

This requirement has been relaxed in C++0x, but I don't know whether the change has been implemented in GCC's C++0x mode yet, and I would be highly surprised to find it present in any other compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
Tested moving the struct out, and works. –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 29 '08 at 3:36
1  
While you're moving the struct out to global level, feel free to also make it inherit from std::unary_function too. :-) –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 29 '08 at 3:38
    
yes this works, thank you very much. I didn't think that moving the class definition out of the function would make a difference. –  Greg Rogers Sep 29 '08 at 3:39

In the comments, Robert Gould asked for a working version for posterity:

#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/random.hpp>

struct bar : std::unary_function<unsigned, unsigned> {
    boost::mt19937 &_state;
    unsigned operator()(unsigned i) {
        boost::uniform_int<> rng(0, i - 1);
        return rng(_state);
    }
    bar(boost::mt19937 &state) : _state(state) {}
};

void foo(std::vector<unsigned> &vec, boost::mt19937 &state)
{
    bar rand(state);
    std::random_shuffle(vec.begin(), vec.end(), rand);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Incidentally, this is not how I format code (I prefer "foo& bar", not "foo &bar"), but I thought I should leave it alone, just for people who think that such edits "might make a difference". –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 29 '08 at 3:46
    
Out of curiosity what benefit does inheriting from unary_function give? It's obvious from operator() what the input and output are... –  Greg Rogers Sep 29 '08 at 3:50
    
It makes the functors more composable. i.e., it provides some typedefs that make building other functors out of your functor easier. Let me hunt down a link for you.... –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 29 '08 at 3:52
2  
I can't find an online article, however, in Effective STL, Item 40 ("Make functor classes adaptable") talks about this. –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 29 '08 at 4:11
    
Thanks Chris Jester-Young! –  Robert Gould Sep 29 '08 at 4:12

I'm using tr1 instead of boost::random here, but should not matter much.

The following is a bit tricky, but it works.

#include <algorithm>
#include <tr1/random>


std::tr1::mt19937 engine;
std::tr1::uniform_int<> unigen;
std::tr1::variate_generator<std::tr1::mt19937, 
                            std::tr1::uniform_int<> >gen(engine, unigen);
std::random_shuffle(vec.begin(), vec.end(), gen);
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't actually work due to an off-by-one error. As written, gen generates integers from 0 through N instead of 0 through N - 1 as required by std::random_shuffle(). –  Spire Nov 4 '11 at 23:07
    
@Spire: uniform_int::operator(engine, N) returns a number in [0,N) (i.e. between 0 and N-1). So this, albeit tricky, actually works. –  baol Nov 12 '11 at 13:30

I thought it was worth pointing out that this is now pretty straightforward in C++11 using only the standard library:

#include <random>
#include <algorithm>

std::random_device rd;
std::mt19937 randEng(rd());
std::shuffle(vec.begin(), vec.end(), randEng);
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