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I am overwriting the save method of a ModelForm and I don't know why it would cause recursion

@parsleyfy
class AccountForm(forms.ModelForm):
    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        # some other code...
        return super(AccountForm, self).save(*args,**kwargs)

causes this:

maximum recursion depth exceeded while calling a Python object

stacktrace shows this line repetitively calling itself

return super(AccountForm, self).save(*args,**kwargs) 

Now, the parsley decorator is like this:

def parsleyfy(klass):
    class ParsleyClass(klass):
      # some code here to add more stuff to the class
    return ParsleyClass

As @DanielRoseman suggested that the Parsley decorator extending the AccountForm causes the super(AccountForm,self) to keep calling itself, what's the solution?

Also I cannot get my head around this why this would cause recursion.

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1  
I dont think you are supposed to return the parent save() method, just do super(AccountForm, self).save(*args,**kwargs) –  PepperoniPizza Feb 6 '13 at 22:12
1  
Are you sure that's your actual code? This is usually what happens if you've mistakenly referred to the superclass in the super call - eg you actually have a subclass of AccountForm, and in that overridden save method you're still calling super(AccountForm...). –  Daniel Roseman Feb 6 '13 at 22:34
    
Thanks @DanielRoseman I have updated the question –  James Lin Feb 6 '13 at 22:58
    
@PepperoniPizza you should definitely return a modelform super save as it is expected to return an instance –  Yuji 'Tomita' Tomita Feb 6 '13 at 23:50
    
@JamesLin What does ParsleyClass do? Can you provide a more complete example? –  Austin Phillips Feb 7 '13 at 3:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you could do is just call the parent's method directly:

@parsleyfy
class AccountForm(forms.ModelForm):
    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        # some other code...
        return forms.ModelForm.save(self, *args,**kwargs)

This should neatly avoid the issue introduced by your class decorator. Another option would be to manually call the decorator on a differently named base class, rather than using @ syntax:

class AccountFormBase(forms.ModelForm):
    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        # some other code...
        return super(AccountFormBase, self).save(*args,**kwargs)

AccountForm = parsleyfy(AccountFormBase)

However, you might also want to consider using a pre-save signal instead, depending on what you're trying to do - it's how one normally adds functionality that should happen before the rest of the model save process in Django.


As for why this is occurring, consider what happens when the code is evaluated.

First, a class is declared. We'll refer to this original class definition as Foo to distinguish it from the later class definition that the decorator will create. This class has a save method which makes a super(AccountForm, self).save(...) call.

This class is then passed to the decorator, which defines a new class which we'll call Bar, and inherits from Foo. Thus, Bar.save is equivalent to Foo.save - it also calls super(AccountForm, self).save(...). This second class is then returned from the decorator.

The returned class (Bar) is assigned to the name AccountForm.

So when you create an AccountForm object, you're creating an object of type Bar. When you call .save(...) on it, it goes and looks up Bar.save, which is actually Foo.save because it inherited from Foo and was never overridden.

As we noted before, Foo.save calls super(AccountForm, self).save(...). The problem is that because of the class decorator, AccountForm isn't Foo, it's Bar - and Bar's parent is Foo.

So when Foo.save looks up AccountForm's parent, it gets... Foo. This means that when it tries to call .save(...) on that parent, it actually just winds up calling itself, hence the endless recursion.

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1  
@JamesLink I also added a note about pre-save signals, which are Django's preferred way of adding functionality that triggers immediately before a model save. –  Amber Feb 7 '13 at 5:28
1  
Another solution to the issue would be to give the original class a different name, then manually call the decorator to create the class you intend to use (e.g. AccountForm). As long as the super call used the name of the original class (and not the name of the decorated version), it should work as intended. –  Blckknght Feb 7 '13 at 5:31
1  
@JamesLin There are other problems that can arise from calling the parent's method directly in some scenarios - especially those that involve things like calling other methods on the same class that may have been overridden. In single-inheritance cases, these issues don't tend to pop up, but multiple inheritance can get really tricky. –  Amber Feb 7 '13 at 5:38
1  
@JamesLin I've expanded my answer with an example of Blckknght's suggestion. –  Amber Feb 7 '13 at 5:43
1  
@JamesLin The intricacies of super() are far too complex to really fit in a single comment thread; I'd suggest reading through artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=236275 and docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#super if you really want to know more. The short story is that the concept of 'parent' becomes a lot more complex when you're using multiple inheritance (multiple superclasses, e.g. class C(A, B):). –  Amber Feb 7 '13 at 5:45

Here is what I have done to make it work, I could either change parsleyfy class to overwrite the save method like this:

def parsleyfy(klass):
    class ParsleyClass(klass):
        def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
            return super(klass, self).save(*args, **kwargs)
    return ParsleyClass

or change the AccountForm's save method to be like this:

@parsleyfy
class AccountForm(forms.ModelForm):
    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        return super(forms.ModelForm, self).save(*args,**kwargs)

One thing I don't what the difference is, is super(Class, self) vs super(Parent, self) I have asked this question

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