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I'd like to use Boost.Test for Test Driven Development.

I asked scons to create two executables, the main one, and the test one. All my main project files are in ./src/, and all my test dedicated files are in ./test/

The problem is:

  • the main project object files are put in ./build/src/
  • the test project object files are put in ./build/test/

and in such a configuration my executable Test cannot link since all the main project object files (of the classes on which I perform my tests) are not in the same directory.

Do you have an idea how I could tweak my scons file so as the linking of the executable Test can use the object files in ./src./ ?

Below is my main.scons file:

import os
env=Environment(CPPPATH=['/usr/local/boost/boost_1_52_0/boost/','./src/'],
                CPPDEFINES=[],
                LIBPATH=['/usr/local/boost/boost_1_52_0/boost/libs/','.'],
                LIBS=['boost_regex'],
                CXXFLAGS="-std=c++0x")
env['ENV']['TERM'] = os.environ['TERM']
env.Program('Main', Glob('src/*.cpp'))

#
testEnv = env.Clone()
testEnv['CPPPATH'].append('./test/')
testEnv['LIBS'].append('boost_unit_test_framework')
testEnv.Program('Test', Glob('test/*.cpp'))
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

While the "duplicate object lists" approach is fine for simple projects, you may run into limitations in which your test code doesn't need to link against the entire object space of your main program. For example, to stub out a database layer that's not the focus of a particular unit test.

As an alternative, you can create (static) libraries of common code that you link against your primary executable and your test framework.

common_sources = ['src/foo.cpp', 'src/bar.cpp'] # or use Glob and then filter
env.Library("common", common_sources)
program_sources = ['src/main.cpp']
env.Program("my_program", program_sources, LIBS=['common'])
...
testEnv['LIBPATH'] = ['.']  # or wherever you build the library
testEnv.Program("unit_test", test_sources, LIBS=['common'])

This also avoids the duplicate main() problem that you mention because only the program_sources and test_sources lists should contain the appropriate file with the main routine.

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I'm not gonna test your solution right now, cause I want to code something, and I've something that can work for the moment. But your solution seem to address exactly at my problems cleanly, so I check your answer. –  Stephane Rolland Feb 6 '13 at 23:58

I have continued searching, and found This post on the web which intrigued me, using the scons env.Object. Indeed this object contains the list of all target object files.

And with slight modifications I have the scons file that does what I wanted (though now I have a problem of dupplicated main function but that's another problem):

import os

env=Environment(CPPPATH=['/usr/local/boost/boost_1_52_0/boost/','./src/'],
                CPPDEFINES=[],
                LIBPATH=['/usr/local/boost/boost_1_52_0/boost/libs/','.'],
                LIBS=['boost_regex'],
                CXXFLAGS="-std=c++0x")
env['ENV']['TERM'] = os.environ['TERM']

# here I keep track of the main project object files
mainObjectFiles = env.Object( Glob('src/*.cpp')) 

env.Program('PostgresCpp', mainObjectFiles)

#
testEnv = env.Clone()
testEnv['CPPPATH'].append('./test/')
testEnv['LIBS'].append('boost_unit_test_framework')

# here I append all needed object files
testObjectFiles =  Glob('test/*.cpp')
testedObjectFiles = Glob('src/*.cpp')
allObjectFilesExceptMain = [x for x in mainObjectFiles if x != 'src/main.o']
allObjectFilesExceptMain.append(testObjectFiles)

testEnv.Program('Test',allObjectFiles)
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