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So I have a pyramid traversal app and I'd like to be able to PUT to URIs that don't exist. Is there a way to do this in the view config?

So for example I have this

@view_defaults(context=models.Groups, renderer='json')
@view_config(request_method='GET')
class GroupsView(object):

    def __call__(self):
        ''' This URI corresponds to GET /groups '''
        pass

    @view_config(request_method='PUT')
    def put(self):
        ''' This URI should correspond to PUT /groups/doesnotexist '''
        pass

Of course the put doesn't work. The context throws a keyerror on doesnotexist, but how do I get the traverser to match a view in this case?

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This sounds like a separate class for Group objects with a Group context and an UndefinedGroup context. Most views work on Group, but you could have a special method responding to PUT requests for UndefinedGroup objects. Note that UndefinedGroup should not subclass Group.

@view_defaults(context=Group, renderer='json')
class GroupView(object):
    def __init__(self, request):
        self.request = request

    @view_config(request_method='GET')
    def get(self):
        # return information about the group

    @view_config(context=UndefinedGroup, request_method='PUT')
    def put_new(self):
        # create a Group from the UndefinedGroup

    @view_config(request_method='PUT')
    def put_overwrite(self):
        # overwrite the old group with a new one

Your traversal tree would then be responsible for creating an UndefinedGroup object if it cannot find a Group.

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Ok that makes sense. I was hoping to not have to define an extra class. –  Falmarri Feb 7 '13 at 20:45
    
You could avoid defining the extra class, but then your GET/POST/etc methods will have to account for both states of the Group object.. one which is real and one which is undefined. This way you just don't have views for an UndefinedGroup and those urls will 404. –  Michael Merickel Feb 7 '13 at 21:47
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My view class doesn't raise the error with PUT or GET method (pyramid version: 1.4.1):

@view_defaults(context='.Group', renderer='json')
@view_config(request_method='GET')
class GroupView(object):
    def __init__(self, context, request):
        self.context = context
        self.request = request

    def __call__(self):
        return {'method':'GET'}

    @view_config(request_method='POST')
    def post(self):
        return {'method':'POST'}

    @view_config(request_method='PUT')
    def put(self):
        return {'method':'PUT'}

    @view_config(request_method='DELETE')
    def delete(self):
        return {'method':'DELETE'}

Maybe the __parent__ and the __name__ attributes has problem. Btw I prefer use Configurator method to bind view functions:

config.add_view('app.views.GroupView', context='app.resources.Group',
                 request_method='GET', renderer='json') # attr=__call__
config.add_view('app.views.GroupView', context='app.resources.Group',
                 attr='put', request_method='PUT', renderer='json')

Use imperative configuration, no extra class but arguments. You can also combine view_defaults decorator and Configurator.add_view() method.

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This isn't really an answer to the question. This does not apply to pyramid's traversal pattern. –  Falmarri Jun 17 '13 at 17:46
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