Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assume I have the following tables:

tableA

a_name | age | country
Jordan | 5 | Germany
Molly | 6 | Spain
Paris | 7 | France
John | 7 | Saudi Arabia
John | 5 | Saudi Arabia
John | 6 | Spain

tableB

id (auto increment primary key) | age | country
1 | 5 | Germany
2 | 6 | Spain
3 | 7 | France
4 | 7 | Spain
5 | 8 | France
6 | 9 | France
7 | 2 | Mexico
8 | 7 | Saudi Arabia
9 | 5 | Saudi Arabia

I want to be able to do some kind of select where I am able to get:

tableA

a_name | age | country | id
Jordan | 5 | Germany | 1
Molly | 6 | Spain | 2
Paris | 7 | France | 3
John | 7 | Saudi Arabia | 8
John | 5 | Saudi Arabia | 5
John | 6 | Spain | 4

Iteratively I fill in what is in the "id" field by looking up what is in tableB for the age and country pair. Is there some SQL query/queries I can do to add that new "id" column which is based on that of table B without having to use a cursor?

share|improve this question
    
last result should be John | 6 | Spain | 2 –  Raphaël Althaus Feb 6 '13 at 22:40
    
if you provide creation statements and sample data dump; responses will be even quicker. What's age doing in country table? –  SparKot ॐ Feb 6 '13 at 22:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The previous answer is correct, but ignores a couple of problems in the way you are approaching the issue.

You should have your Country table referenced by a country_id field in your kids table: that way you are not duplicating the info (what happens in your design when a country changes its name?). You are also making a poor choice by storing the age of the people: you should store the date (or year) of birth instead, to avoid having to recalculate their age.

Kids table:

name | DOB         | country_id | id
Joe  | Aug 11 2005 | 1          | 1
Jim  | Sep 09 2007 | 21         | 2

Countries table:

id | name
1  | UK
2  | Germany

Then the select statement you need is:

select kids.name, kids.DOB, countries.name, kids.id from kids join countries on kids.country_id = countries.id

You can then either calculate the ages in your application, or you can incorporate a calculation into your SQL, see (for example) http://ma.tt/2003/12/calculate-age-in-mysql/

Edit

After reading your clarification that the age column is the age of the person at the time of their visit to the country, I would suggest a three-table design instead, still following the same principles of storing dates, not ages, and only storing each item of data once:

People table

Structure

CREATE TABLE `countries` (
 `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `name` varchar(22) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
 PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

Sample content

id | name  | DOB
1  | Joe   | 2005-08-11
2  | Jim   | 2007-09-09
3  | Carol | 2008-01-22

Countries table

Structure

CREATE TABLE `countries` (
 `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `name` varchar(22) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
 PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

Sample data

id | name
1  | UK
2  | Germany
3  | Saudi Arabia

Visits table

Structure

CREATE TABLE `visits` (
 `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `person_id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL,
 `country_id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL,
 `date_of_visit` date NOT NULL,
 PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
 KEY `person_id` (`person_id`),
 KEY `country_id` (`country_id`),
 CONSTRAINT `visits_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`person_id`) REFERENCES `people` (`id`),
 CONSTRAINT `visits_ibfk_2` FOREIGN KEY (`country_id`) REFERENCES `countries` (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

Sample data

id | person_id | country_id | date_of_visit
1  | 1         | 1          | 2009-01-02
2  | 1         | 2          | 2010-01-01

Then the query you need to get the data you want is:

select 
 people.name, 
 people.DOB, 
 countries.name, 
 visits.date_of_visit 
from 
 visits 
  join 
 countries 
  on 
   visits.country_id = countries.id
  join 
 people
  on
   visits.person_id = people.id;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the design lesson ;-) –  SparKot ॐ Feb 6 '13 at 22:59
    
I don't understand what you mean by "age the person to that country". –  Dave Mulligan Feb 6 '13 at 23:32
    
"the age at which the person visited to that country" –  Rolando Feb 7 '13 at 4:59
select a.a_name, a.age, a.country, b.id
FROM tableA a
JOIN tableB b on a.age = b.age and a.country = b.country

SqlFiddle

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.