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Assuming I have the following:

tableA

id (auto increment primary key) | age | country
1 | 5 | Germany
2 | 6 | Spain
3 | 7 | France
4 | 7 | Spain
5 | 8 | France
6 | 9 | France
7 | 2 | Mexico
8 | 7 | Saudi Arabia
9 | 5 | Saudi Arabia

I want the resulting table:

tableA

id (auto increment primary key) | age | country | country_number
1 | 5 | Germany | 1
2 | 6 | Spain | 2
3 | 7 | France | 3
4 | 7 | Spain | 2
5 | 8 | France | 3
6 | 9 | France | 3
7 | 2 | Mexico | 4
8 | 7 | Saudi Arabia | 5
9 | 5 | Saudi Arabia | 5

Note that "country_number" just a unique number based on whatever a unique country name is.

Using a cursor is slow. How do I make it such that I can do some sort of "group by"? to assign a unique identifier per country? Or is group by not necessary?

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Updated answer for the step-by-step operations. –  Raphaël Althaus Feb 6 '13 at 23:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

query could be (you won't have 5 for Saudi Arabia, but at least distinct country_number for each country)

select a.id, a.age, a.country, b.minId as country_number
FROM TableA a
INNER JOIN (SELECT MIN(id) as minId, country
            FROM TableA
            GROUP BY country) as b
      ON a.country = b.country

SqlFiddle

To do things properly,

CREATE TABLE COUNTRY(id int PRIMARY KEY auto_increment, name VARCHAR(100))
SELECT distinct COUNTRY as name FROM TableB;

ALTER TABLE TableB Add column countryID int NOT NULL DEFAULT 0;

UPDATE TableB b, country c
set b.countryID = c.Id
where b.country = c.name;

ALTER TABLE TableB drop column country;

ALTER TABLE TableB add  FOREIGN KEY(countryID) REFERENCES country(id); 

see SqlFiddle

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I altered the insert values a bit, and noticed there is a numbering issue (notice how 4,5,6 are skipped in the SqlFiddle below). What is wrong? sqlfiddle.com/#!2/10b3b/1/0 . –  Rolando Feb 7 '13 at 0:03
    
@Damascusi as said in answer, you will have a unique id for each country, but not sequential (the query is taking just the minimal id in the table for each country). With the second version (with a country table), you'll have sequential values (at start). –  Raphaël Althaus Feb 7 '13 at 0:11

You should create a separate table to store countries, then store the primary key (country_id) from countries as a foreign key in your current table.

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