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Well, I have to find how many different numbers are in an array.

For example if array is: 1 9 4 5 8 3 1 3 5

The output should be 6, because 1,9,4,5,8,3 are unique and 1,3,5 are repeating (not unique).

So, here is my code so far..... not working properly thought.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    int r = 0, a[50], n;
    cin >> n;
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        cin >> a[i];
    }
    for (int j = 0; j < n; j++) {
        for (int k = 0; k < j; k++) {
            if (a[k] != a[j]) r++;
        }
    }
    cout << r << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Sort the array, then it's trivial. Try to figure out for yourself how the complexity of that compares to the complexity of your solution. –  Kerrek SB Feb 6 '13 at 23:31
    
This seems like homework to me... but yes, you can sort the array, or you can use a hashtable. –  Reinderien Feb 6 '13 at 23:32
2  
seems SO is a good place to get last minute homework done. format question, post it on SO, ???, get answer! –  thang Feb 7 '13 at 0:11
    
@thang: Seems it's not - considering that nearly all answers to this questions have either an incorrect algorithm or use the standard library to do the job - which apparently is not what this homework is about ... –  JoergB Feb 8 '13 at 10:46
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6 Answers

A std::set contains only unique elements already.

#include <set>

int main()
{
    int a[] = { 1, 9, 4, 5, 8, 3, 1, 3, 5 };

    std::set<int> sa(a, a + 9);
    std::cout << sa.size() << std::endl;
}
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Thanks, works great. :) –  user2041143 Feb 7 '13 at 0:15
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How about this?

#include <list>

int main()
{
    int a[] = {1, 9, 4, 5, 8, 3, 1, 3, 5};

    std::list<int> la(a, a+9);
    la.sort();
    la.unique();
    std::cout << la.size() << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good, but I don't think this helps him learn.. –  0x499602D2 Feb 6 '13 at 23:36
    
You also could have used std::set :P –  Rapptz Feb 6 '13 at 23:36
    
yeah, or even sort on array then compare adjacent elements... –  billz Feb 6 '13 at 23:37
    
Well, my problem is that I haven't studied vectors yet and I have to make this using loops / arrays only. Any help with that? –  user2041143 Feb 6 '13 at 23:45
    
You need to sort it first, then count adjacent elements. –  billz Feb 6 '13 at 23:45
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Let me join the party ;)

You could also use a hash-table:

#include <unordered_set>
#include <iostream>

int main() {

    int a[] = { 1, 9, 4, 5, 8, 3, 1, 3, 5 };
    const size_t len = sizeof(a) / sizeof(a[0]);

    std::unordered_set<int> s(a, a + len);

    std::cout << s.size() << std::endl;
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;

}

Not that it matters here, but this will likely have the best performance for large arrays.


If the difference between smallest and greatest element is reasonably small, then you could do something even faster:

  • Create a vector<bool> that spans the range between min and max element (if you knew the array elements at compile-time, I'd suggest the std::bitset instead, but then you could just compute everything in the compile-time using template meta-programming anyway).
  • For each element of the input array, set the corresponding flag in vector<bool>.
  • Once you are done, simply count the number of trues in the vector<bool>.
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Thanks for your help, although this is not very basic, I appreciate your help. –  user2041143 Feb 7 '13 at 0:06
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I think the location for increasing the value of r is incorrect

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int r=0,a[50],n;
    cin >>n;
    for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
        cin >> a[i];
    }
    for (int j=0;j<n;j++)
    {   
        bool flag = true;  
        for(int k=;k<j;k++)
        {
            if(a[k]!=a[j])
            {
               flag = false;
               break;
            }
       }
       if (true == flag) 
       {
           r++;
       }
    }
    cout << r << endl;
    return 0;
}

However, my suggestion is using more sophisticated algorithms (this algorithm has O(N^2)).

share|improve this answer
1  
O(n^2) complexity and if (true == flag)? The latter is particularly scary. –  dreamlax Feb 6 '13 at 23:42
    
This solution is not working as intended. Can anyone check? –  user2041143 Feb 6 '13 at 23:59
1  
@user2041143: can't you? –  Nik Bougalis Feb 7 '13 at 0:00
    
I did, and it didn't work as intended. –  user2041143 Feb 7 '13 at 0:01
    
No, I meant, can't you figure out why it's not working as intended? –  Nik Bougalis Feb 7 '13 at 0:14
show 2 more comments

this should work, however its probably not the optimum solution.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
int a[50],n;        
int uniqueNumbers; // this will be the total numbers entered and we will -- it
cin >>n;    
uniqueNumbers = n;  
for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
{
    cin >> a[i];
}   
for (int j=0;j<n;j++)
{   
    for(int k=0;k<n;k++)
    {
        /* 
        the and clause below is what I think you were missing.
        you were probably getting false positatives when j == k because a[1] will always == a[1] ;-)
        */
        if((a[k] == a[j]) && (k!=j)) 
        { uniqueNumebers--; }
    }       
}
cout << uniqueNumbers << endl;
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The solution does not work as intended :( –  user2041143 Feb 7 '13 at 0:03
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Since you've stated that you cannot use the standard library and must use loops, let's try this solution instead.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std; // you're a bad, bad boy!

int main() 
{
    int r = 0, a[50], n;

    cout << "How many numbers will you input? ";
    cin >> n;

    if(n <= 0)
    {
        cout << "What? Put me in Coach. I'm ready! I can do this!" << endl;
        return -1;
    }

    if(n > 50)
    {
        cout << "So many numbers! I... can't do this Coach!" << endl;
        return -1;
    }   

    cout << "OK... Enter your numbers now." << endl;

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        cin >> a[i];


    cout << "Let's see... ";

    // We could sort the list but that's a bit too much. We will choose the
    // naive approach which is O(n^2), but that's OK. We're still learning!

    for (int i = 0; i != n; i++) 
    { // Go through the list once.      
        for (int j = 0; j != i; j++)
        { // And check if this number has already appeared in the list:
            if((i != j) && (a[j] == a[i]))
            { // A duplicate number!        
                r++; 
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    cout << "I count " << n - r << " unique numbers!" << endl;

    return 0;
}

I urge you to not submit this code as your homework - at least not without understanding it. You will only do yourself a disservice, and chances are that your instructor will know that you didn't write it anyways: I've been a grader before, and it's fairly obvious when someone's code quality magically improves.

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1  
This solves a different problem: it counts the values that occur exactly once, not all different values. –  JoergB Feb 8 '13 at 10:40
    
@joergb You are wrong. Read the code again - and tell me what n - r calculates. It's really not difficult to figure it out; you can even run the code if you must. –  Nik Bougalis Feb 8 '13 at 13:58
1  
I read the code again, I now even ran it against the test input of the OP: with that input it returns 3, not 6 as for the specified problem. It is as I said: your code counts numbers that occur only once. r counts all instances of numbers that occur repeatedly - even the first. The OP wanted a count of all different numbers. The solutions using std::set or std:: list get that right. –  JoergB Feb 8 '13 at 14:17
    
Oh wow, you're right. I totally misread the problem. Will tweak the code. –  Nik Bougalis Feb 8 '13 at 14:40
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