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How to delete all indexes from one database, whether clustered or nonclustered?

I need do that with script, not over GUI.

EDITED

Database has 7 tables, some of them are lookups, some are related over foreign keys. Every table has minimal one index, created in time the primary key was created, so automatically was created constraint. When deleting such indexes over an GUI, I got an error that indexes cannot be deleted because of dependency on other keys.

So, I need to first delete an indexes keys that are foreign keys, and then an indexes created over primary keys.

share|improve this question
    
Can you explain why you want to do this? –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 7 '13 at 0:03
    
I have sample database with some created indexes. I want to create some practice of using Database Engine Tuning Advisor, and if I have heap tables, this will be good example. So, purpose is to let Tuning Advisor advice me which indexes to create on which objects. I think I am explain well :) –  veljasije Feb 7 '13 at 0:12
    
Fair enough. :-) –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 7 '13 at 0:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Slightly different variation of dynamic SQL, however it drops foreign keys first, then primary keys, then indexes (non-clustered indexes first so that you don't convert to a heap (which can affect all the non-clustered indexes)).

USE specific_database;
GO

First, delete all foreign keys:

DECLARE @sql NVARCHAR(MAX);

SET @sql = N'';

SELECT @sql = @sql + N'ALTER TABLE ' 
  + QUOTENAME(OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME([parent_object_id]))
  + '.' + QUOTENAME(OBJECT_NAME([parent_object_id])) 
  + ' DROP CONSTRAINT ' + QUOTENAME(name) + ';
'
FROM sys.foreign_keys
WHERE OBJECTPROPERTY([parent_object_id], 'IsMsShipped') = 0;

EXEC sp_executesql @sql;

Now drop primary keys:

DECLARE @sql NVARCHAR(MAX);

SET @sql = N'';

SELECT @sql = @sql + N'ALTER TABLE '
  + QUOTENAME(OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME([parent_object_id]))
  + '.' + QUOTENAME(OBJECT_NAME([parent_object_id])) 
  + ' DROP CONSTRAINT ' + QUOTENAME(name) + ';
'
FROM sys.key_constraints 
WHERE [type] = 'PK'
AND OBJECTPROPERTY([parent_object_id], 'IsMsShipped') = 0;

EXEC sp_executesql @sql;

And finally, indexes, non-clustered first:

DECLARE @sql NVARCHAR(MAX);

SET @sql = N'';

SELECT @sql = @sql + N'DROP INDEX ' 
  + QUOTENAME(name) + ' ON '
  + QUOTENAME(OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME([object_id]))
  + '.' + QUOTENAME(OBJECT_NAME([object_id])) + ';
'
FROM sys.indexes 
WHERE index_id > 0
AND OBJECTPROPERTY([object_id], 'IsMsShipped') = 0
ORDER BY [object_id], index_id DESC;

EXEC sp_executesql @sql;

Note that the database engine tuning advisor will recommend a bunch of these indexes (and depending on the workload you present it, may miss some, and may suggest redundant and nearly duplicate indexes). However it is not going to recommend any of the data integrity stuff you just deleted (PK, FK, unique constraints).

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, this code will erase nonclustered indexes. But what will clustered which was created in momment when primary key was created? Is there some restriction while deleting because of keys dependency? –  veljasije Feb 7 '13 at 0:22
    
@veljasije yes, that is true, I assumed these were just clustered and non-clustered indexes, constraints will require additional handling. –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 7 '13 at 0:28
    
My apology, I didn't explicitly mention all stuff I need. I will rewrite my question. –  veljasije Feb 7 '13 at 0:31

create a Dynamic SQL

DECLARE @qry nvarchar(max);
SELECT @qry =  (SELECT  'DROP INDEX ' + ix.name + ' ON ' + OBJECT_NAME(ID) + '; '
                FROM  sysindexes ix
                WHERE   ix.Name IS NOT NULL AND 
                        ix.Name LIKE '%prefix_%'
                FOR XML PATH(''));
EXEC sp_executesql @qry
share|improve this answer
2  
Please use sys.indexes unless you know the OP is using SQL Server 2000. sysindexes will eventually be dropped from the product... –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 6 '13 at 23:56
2  
Also be careful about not using a schema prefix - not all objects are in dbo and not every user's default schema is dbo... –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 7 '13 at 0:05

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