Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a simple financial app in Ruby that can keep track of a user's expenses and generate reports based on them.

Expenses belong to different categories, which affects how much of each expenses is taxes.

In my code to generate a report on expenses, I have this piece:

  tax_totals = [0] * 13
  totals = [0] * 13
  expenses.each do |expense|
    tax_ratio = tax_rate/(1+tax_rate)
    category = Category.find(expense.category_id).first
    tax_ratio *= category.tax_rate.to_f / 100
    if !expense.rate_id.nil?
      subcategory = Rate.where("id = ?", expense.rate_id).first
      tax_ratio *= subcategory.tax_rate.to_f
    end
    tax_totals[expense.transaction_date.to_date.month] +=
      (expense.amount * tax_ratio)
    totals[expense.transaction_date.to_date.month] += expense.amount
  end

I keep getting a syntax error on the line tax_ratio = tax_rate/(1+tax_rate):

syntax error, unexpected '(', expecting keyword_end

If I remove that line, the error moves to tax_ratio *= category.tax_rate.to_f / 100 line:

syntax error, unexpected tINTEGER, expecting keyword_end

and I have NO IDEA, where this is coming from. I don't see anything wrong with the code at all. I have very similar code in multiple functions each doing the calculations slightly differently. But only this one is an issue.

Maybe it's the lack of caffeine. Is there something wrong with this code? Could there be something else in the file causing this? How can I proceed with debugging?

Cheers!

EDIT: I figured it out. Ruby noob mistake. See answer below.

share|improve this question
    
Where is tax_rate defined? –  cymorg Feb 6 '13 at 23:55
    
Just above the tax_totals –  Shinigami Feb 7 '13 at 17:41

2 Answers 2

As written above, this is valid Ruby. I was able to get your code into a method and call it. See below:

require 'active_support/all'
require 'rspec'

class Category
  def self.find(category_id)
    [new]
  end

  def tax_rate
    0.5
  end
end

class Rate
  def self.where(*args)
    [new]
  end

  def tax_rate
    0.5
  end
end

def ratio(expenses, tax_rate)
  tax_totals = [0] * 13
  totals = [0] * 13
  expenses.each do |expense|
    tax_ratio = tax_rate/(1+tax_rate)
    category = Category.find(expense.category_id).first
    tax_ratio *= category.tax_rate.to_f / 100
    if !expense.rate_id.nil?
      subcategory = Rate.where("id = ?", expense.rate_id).first
      tax_ratio *= subcategory.tax_rate.to_f
    end
    tax_totals[expense.transaction_date.to_date.month] +=
      (expense.amount * tax_ratio)
    totals[expense.transaction_date.to_date.month] += expense.amount
  end
end


describe "#ratio" do

  let(:expense) do
    double("expense", category_id: 5, rate_id: 6, transaction_date: 5.days.ago, amount: 5)
  end
  let(:expenses) { [expense] }
  let(:tax_rate) { 0.25 }

  it "should run" do
    ratio(expenses, tax_rate)
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
those Category and Rate classes are awesome! :o Never seen it doing this like that. But shouldn't find method return only one record instead of an array? Unless this is an old rails version. –  Ismael Abreu Feb 7 '13 at 0:18
    
Ah... you're right. That used to be 'where' instead. Trying find was a desperate measure. –  Shinigami Feb 7 '13 at 1:10

I am new to Ruby and Rails and to me this was the weirdest thing ever.

The error was coming from such an innocent looking line that I didn't even bother to include it in my original question.

tax_rate was a variable that was getting passed to the method. It's stored in a DB as an integer, so I needed to convert it to a decimal point. This was the more complete code:

  tax_rate = tax_rate.to_f /100
  tax_totals = [0] * 13
  totals = [0] * 13
  expenses.each do |expense|
    tax_ratio = tax_rate/(1+tax_rate)
    category = Category.find(expense.category_id).first
    tax_ratio *= category.tax_rate.to_f / 100
    if !expense.rate_id.nil?
      subcategory = Rate.where("id = ?", expense.rate_id).first
      tax_ratio *= subcategory.tax_rate.to_f
    end
    tax_totals[expense.transaction_date.to_date.month] +=
      (expense.amount * tax_ratio)
    totals[expense.transaction_date.to_date.month] += expense.amount
  end

And that first line is what Ruby doesn't like and I still don't know why. But you can't put myVar /100 it has to be myVar / 100 or even myVar/ 100 but there absolutely needs to be a space between / and the number.

share|improve this answer
    
So next time, before you ask of errors, please, simplify your code so that all unnecessary variables and constants are away and only the bare bone error-causing code remains. That way, you frequently discover the error without having to ask. –  Boris Stitnicky Feb 7 '13 at 21:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.