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...unless something else from the library is called. Here is a minimal example.

test1.cpp

#include <iostream>

void proofOfTwoLinked();

template <class T>
struct Foo
{
    void bar(){ std::cout << "normal bar\n"; }
};

struct A{};
struct B{};
struct C{};
struct D{};

template <> void Foo<B>::bar(){ std::cout << "B bar\n"; }

int main()
{
    Foo<A> a;
    Foo<B> b;
    Foo<C> c;
    Foo<D> d;

    a.bar();
    b.bar();
    c.bar();
    d.bar();

    //proofOfTwoLinked();
}

test2.cpp

#include <iostream>

struct C;

template <class T>
struct Foo
{
    void bar(){ std::cout << "normal bar\n"; }
};

template <> void Foo<C>::bar(){ std::cout << "C bar\n"; }

void proofOfTwoLinked()
{
    std::cout << "Yup, two is linked\n";
}

If I compile the two together, the program works as expected:

$ rm test; rm *.a; rm *.o; g++ -c test1.cpp; g++ -c test2.cpp; g++ -o test test1.o test2.o; ./test
normal bar
B bar
C bar
normal bar

If I compile test2, put it in an archive, and then link the program against that... the specialization for type C is not executed when c.bar() is called:

$ rm test; rm *.a; rm *.o; g++ -c test1.cpp; g++ -c test2.cpp; ar -r test2.a test2.o; g++ -o test test1.o test2.a; ./test
ar: creating test2.a
normal bar
B bar
normal bar
normal bar

But if I uncomment the last function call of test1 (proofOfTwoLinked) and then compile again, the specialization is executed.

$ rm test; rm *.a; rm *.o; g++ -c test1.cpp; g++ -c test2.cpp; ar -r test2.a test2.o; g++ -o test test1.o test2.a; ./test
ar: creating test2.a
normal bar
B bar
C bar
normal bar
Yup, two is linked

This strikes me as weird, and is certainly contrary to my expectation. Is this in fact normal behavior? Perhaps since there already exists some form of every function that is called in main() before the linker searches test2.a it skips the archive. Is there a way to force the linker to "look at the whole archive"?

I'm using gcc 4.6.1 and ar 2.21.53 (in ubuntu).

share|improve this question
    
Also, evidently if I declare template <> void Foo<C>::bar(); in test1 then it works too. I guess this is enough of a work-around for me to use in what I'm actually working on (i.e. just declare specializations in the headers)... I'm still curious about it though. –  cheshirekow Feb 6 '13 at 23:55
    
With few exceptions templates need to be put in headers. The code from templates is generated when needed at compile time so they cannot easily be packaged as libraries (NB: some compilers provide work arounds for this but they're not portable). –  Jack Aidley Feb 7 '13 at 9:04
    
So the template itself is in the "header" (note the same template declaration in both .cpp files, emulates a header while making my post smaller). The problem is the specialization of the member function, which I guess also has to be in a header. –  cheshirekow Feb 7 '13 at 21:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using MSVC2010SP1 I get slightly different results:

compiling together as is I don't get "C bar". This is as expected because test1.cpp and test2.cpp are separate compilation units and with no forward declarations of the specializations that the other contains test1.cpp will instantiate its the default "normal bar" and test2.cpp will not instantiate the "C bar" because it can't see anything using it.

when I uncomment proofOfTwoLinked(); i get "Yup, two is linked" which is expected because "proofOfTwoLinked()" is forward declaired. I still don't get "C bar" which is as expected because it is not forward declaired in test1.cpp

When I compile again adding

template <> void Foo<C>::bar(); 

to test1.cpp I get a linker error because although the test1.cpp compilation unit now knows there is a

template <> void Foo<C>::bar()

out there somewhere, test2.cpp still does not know that anyone is using it.

When I compile again adding

template void Foo<C>::bar();

to test2.cpp everything works and I get "C bar". Note that

template void Foo<C>::bar();

must be BEFORE its definition.

As far as I can tell MSVC is acting correctly and gcc is acting weird in your case. I used http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2005/n1905.pdf section 14.7 as a reference, it might be helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
I posted a minimal example (as well as the command to compile and test!) that illustrates the issue so I'm not sure what you might think is missing. When you say that you don't understand how main() sees the specialization, that is exactly what I don't understand. Also, Foo<C> isn't specialized, only Foo<C>::bar(). Foo<c> contains all the same data members and other member functions from the base template (though in this example... there are no others). Think of it as a "static override"... no vtable required. –  cheshirekow Feb 7 '13 at 21:23
    
Ok maybe I was too quick, I'm away from my compiler 'till tomorrow, if no one answers by then I will see if I can't get it working. –  PorkyBrain Feb 7 '13 at 21:31
    
Now my answer should be complete –  PorkyBrain Feb 8 '13 at 13:54
    
Thanks for looking into it. I think you're right and gcc is acting a bit weird. It makes more sense to me now. –  cheshirekow Feb 8 '13 at 16:18

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