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I have this program that needs to handle large numbers to factorize a number into primes.. Just like the RSA factorization challenge.

I got this list in a txt file with prime numbers. this is the piece of code I use to make that list:

int export_list (int lim = 50)
{
    int last_in_txt = 0;
    {
        ifstream infile ("Primes.txt");
        int k;
        while(infile >> k)
        { last_in_txt = k; }
    }
    // Now last_in_txt is assigned properly, and Primes.txt is closed

    cout << "\nLast number in \"Primes.txt\": " << last_in_txt << endl << endl;
    cout << "Press <Enter> to start appending primes... ";
    cin.get();
    cout << "\nAppend started:\n";

    last_in_txt++;

    ofstream file ("Primes.txt" , ios::app);
    int x, counter;

    if (file.is_open()) // if it opens correctly
    {
        for (x = last_in_txt , counter = 0 ; counter < lim ; x++ , counter++)
        {
            if (check_prime (x)) // returns 1 when x is prime, returns 0 when not
            {
                cout << "Appending " << x << "\t\t" << "Estimated time remaining: " << (lim - counter) / 1000 <<endl;
                file << x << " ";
            }
        }
        cout << "Done!" << endl << endl << pressenter;
        cin.get();
    }
    else
    {
        cout << "Unable to open file" << endl << pressenter;
        cin.get();
    }
    return(0);
}

The thing is that when I get to the point that this txt file contains numbers bigger than 32bits, it wont process them... and the last_in_txt variable will always store the last number in the txt file that is not bigger than 32 bit...

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1  
is it bigger than a 64bit number? –  MerickOWA Feb 7 '13 at 0:36
    
Is there any limit to the size of the numbers? –  Robᵩ Feb 7 '13 at 0:36
    
Just use a long long instead to keep your program busy for years. –  Hans Passant Feb 7 '13 at 0:44
    
@MerickOWA they are like this 37975227936943673922808872755445627854565536638199 –  Henrique Ferrolho Feb 7 '13 at 1:18
    
Okay, more than years. The answer is 42. Do avoid wasting your energy on such problems: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integer_factorization –  Hans Passant Feb 7 '13 at 1:57

1 Answer 1

If a 64-bit integer is enough, use int64_t. If you need bigger numbers, check this question: Bigint (bigbit) library

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