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I've been switching Template Factory functions to use (and understand) std::forward to support rvalues and move semantics. My usual boilerplate factory functions for template classes have always marked the parameters as const:

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>

template<typename T, typename U>
struct MyPair{
    MyPair(const T& t, const U& u):t(t),u(u){};

    T t;
    U u;
};

template<typename T, typename U>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const MyPair<T,U>& pair){
    os << "(" << pair.t << ")=>" << pair.u;
    return os;
}

template<typename T, typename U>
MyPair<T,U> MakeMyPair(const T& t, const U& u){
    return MyPair<T,U>(t,u);
}

using namespace std;
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {    

    auto no_forward = MakeMyPair(num, num);
    std::cout << no_forward << std::endl;

    auto no_forward2 = MakeMyPair(100, false);
    std::cout << no_forward2 << std::endl;
}

Compiles as expected. Initially I converted MakeMyPair to also pass the parameters as const but this won't compile on my Mac using XCode 4.6:

//$ clang --version
//Apple LLVM version 4.2 (clang-425.0.24) (based on LLVM 3.2svn)
//Target: x86_64-apple-darwin12.2.0
//Thread model: posix


template<typename T, typename U>
MyPair<T,U> MakeMyPair_Forward(const T&& t, const U&& u){
    return MyPair<T,U>(std::forward<const T>(t),std::forward<const U>(u));
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { 
    int num = 37;
    auto anotherPair = MakeMyPair_Forward(num, true); //This won't work

    auto allRvalues = MakeMyPair_Forward(73, false);   //will compile 
    std::cout << allRvalues  << std::endl;
}

No matching function for call to 'MakeMyPair_Forward' Candidate function [with T = int, U = bool] not viable: no known conversion from 'int' to 'const int &&' for 1st argument

This makes sense from http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/forward which states const is deduced and I'm passing lvalue.

  • If a call to wrapper() passes an rvalue std::string, then T is deduced to std::string (not std::string&, const std::string&, or std::string&&), and std::forward ensures that an rvalue reference is passed to foo.
  • If a call to wrapper() passes a const lvalue std::string, then T is deduced to const std::string&, and std::forward ensures that a const lvalue reference is passed to foo.
  • If a call to wrapper() passes a non-const lvalue std::string, then T is deduced to std::string&, and std::forward ensures that a non-const lvalue reference is passed to foo.

Removing const works as I want with rvalues and lvalues. Only passing rvalues as types will work with const on MakeMyPair_Forward's parameters.

//This works for rvalues and lvalues
template<typename T, typename U>
MyPair<T,U> MakeMyPair_Forward(T&& t, U&& u){
    return MyPair<T,U>(std::forward<const T>(t),std::forward<const U>(u));
}

So, the question. Does it make any sense to mark an rvalue reference as const when passing as a parameter? It's not like I can change an rvalue, it's just temporary. I was a bit surprised it compiled with the const after working through and fixing my code. Why would you mark an rvalue parameter as const? Would the point be to only provide an API that takes rvalues? If so, wouldn't you use type traits instead to prevent lvalue references? http://stackoverflow.com/a/7863645/620304

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
If you don't want to modify it, it doesn't really matter if it's a temporary or not. –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 7 '13 at 1:45
    
My thinking was you can't modify it because it is temporary. So marking as const doesn't really make sense to me. –  Joel Feb 7 '13 at 13:59
    
why shouldn't you be able to modify a temporary? –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 7 '13 at 14:05
    
I see your point. You're right. You can do something like int&& i = 3; i++; I was thinking more in the context of just passing 3 as the rvalue. I'm just used to forcing const in my factories because I'm used to really only dealing with lvalues. Part of my personal learning curve with C++11 I suppose. –  Joel Feb 7 '13 at 14:27
    
I am not going to vote to close as duplicate, but at least the link should be put here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4938875/… –  jogojapan Mar 4 '13 at 5:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So, the question. Does it make any sense to mark an rvalue reference as const when passing as a parameter?

Here is one place this is done in the C++11 standard:

template <class T> reference_wrapper<T> ref(T&) noexcept;
template <class T> reference_wrapper<const T> cref(const T&) noexcept;
template <class T> void ref(const T&&) = delete;
template <class T> void cref(const T&&) = delete;

I.e. A const T&& is used to capture all rvalues, const or not, and toss them to a compile-time error, while allowing lvalues, even const lvalues to bind and work.

Now this could also probably be done with T&& and an enable_if constraint. But if there's one thing that C++ has taught us over the past few decades: Don't burn any bridges in language design. The C++ programmer will often find a clever way to use a language feature that was initially thought useless. And it is in that spirit that const T&& was left as a legal option.

share|improve this answer
    
That seems like a valid use case. It reads easier too and using type traits might make it harder to implement. I hadn't thought about deleting functions and implicitly created constructors using the delete keyword. –  Joel Feb 7 '13 at 14:14
1  
Just fyi, those aren't constructors but deleted namespace-scope functions. And that is a really cool new thing in C++11, a way to disable a non-member function! :-) Previously the best we could do was declare and not define it, delaying the error until link time. –  Howard Hinnant Feb 7 '13 at 18:57

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