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I am building an ASP.NET MVC 4 application using Entity Framework as my ORM on top of an existing SQL Server database. This is model-first, not code-first. I am fairly new to LINQ to Entities. Recently I ran into something that gave me many problems and I had great trouble finding any help online. I've now solved it, twice. This is my story.

I have a view that need to display a list of Modules (as in, classroom teaching). Each Module belongs to a Unit, but each Unit can have many Modules. Each Module can have multiple Instructors, and each Instructor can teach many Modules. There is a ModuleInstructor table to join that relationship.

Unit           Module        ModuleInstructor         Instructor
========  1:N  ========  N:1 ==================  1:N  ============
UnitID         ModuleID      ModuleInsturctorID       InstructorID
UnitName       UnitID        ModuleID                 InstructorName
               StartDate     InsturctorID

EntityFramework has these for objects [unnecessary properties trimmed for brevity]:

public partial class Unit
{
  public int UnitID { get; set; }
  public string UnitName { get; set; }
  public virtual ICollection<Module> Module { get; set; }
}

public partial class Module
{
  public Module()
  {
    this.ModuleInstructor = new HashSet<ModuleInstructor>();
    this.Record = new HashSet<Record>();
  }
  public int ModuleID { get; set; }
  public Nullable<int> UnitID { get; set; }
  public Nullable<System.DateTime> ModuleDate { get; set; }
  public virtual Unit Unit { get; set; }
  public virtual ICollection<ModuleInstructor> ModuleInstructor { get; set; }
}

public partial class ModuleInstructor
{
  public int ModuleInstructorID { get; set; }
  public Nullable<int> InstructorID { get; set; }
  public Nullable<int> ModuleID { get; set; }
  public Instructor Instructor { get; set; }
  public virtual Module Module { get; set; }
}

public partial class Instructor
{
  public Instructor()
  {
    this.ModuleInstructor = new HashSet<ModuleInstructor>();
  }
  public int InstructorID { get; set; }
  public string InstructorName { get; set; }
  public virtual ICollection<ModuleInstructor> ModuleInstructor { get; set; }
}

Anyway, I wanted to display: UnitName, ModuleDate, Instructor(s) in a comma-separated list. My problem was that I had the hardest time getting Linq to get the Instructors, all I could retrieve was the ModuleInstructors which didn't have any of the Instructor information loaded.

private Entities db = new Entities();

public ActionResult Index(int p = 1)
{
  int pageSize = 20;

  var modules = db.Modules
    .Include(m => m.Unit)
    .Include(m => m.ModuleInstructor)
    .Include(m => m.ModuleInstructor.Instructor)  //Doesn't work
    .OrderByDescending(m => m.ModuleStartDate)
    .Skip(pageSize * (p - 1))
    .Take(pageSize);

  return View(modules);
}

My first solution was to modify the Module class to add another collection:

public partial class Module
{
  public Module()
  {
    this.ModuleInstructor = new HashSet<ModuleInstructor>();
    this.Record = new HashSet<Record>();
  }
  public int ModuleID { get; set; }
  public Nullable<int> UnitID { get; set; }
  public Nullable<System.DateTime> ModuleDate { get; set; }
  public virtual Unit Unit { get; set; }
  public virtual ICollection<Instructor> Instructor { get; set; } //Added
  public virtual ICollection<ModuleInstructor> ModuleInstructor { get; set; }
}

In the ModuleController I got everything except the Instructors, then the Instructors separately and for looped through inserting them into the collection.

private Entities db = new Entities();

public ActionResult Index(int p = 1)
{
  int pageSize = 20;

  var modules = db.Modules
    .Include(m => m.Unit)
    .Include(m => m.ModuleInstructor)
    .OrderByDescending(m => m.ModuleStartDate)
    .Skip(pageSize * (p - 1))
    .Take(pageSize);

  var instructors = db.Instructors.ToList();

  foreach (var m in modules)
  {
    m.Instructor = new List<Instructor>();
    foreach (var mi in m.ModuleInstructor)
    {
      m.Instructor.Add(instructors
        .Where(i => i.InstructorID == mi.InstructorID).SingleOrDefault());
    }
  }

  return View(modules);
}

According to LinqPad this take two SQL statements. Not too bad. It's not that much of strain on the server either because I don't have many Instructors and there are only 20 Modules being shown at any one time.

However, I figured there must be a way to do it in one database call. Here's my new solution. I still loop through inserting Instructors into the Modules object's Instructor collection, but I get all the Instructors with everything else.

public ActionResult Index(int p = 1)
{
  int pageSize = 20;

  var modules = db.Modules
    .Include(m => m.Unit)
    .Include(m => m.ModuleInstructor)
    .Include(m => m.ModuleInstructor.Select(mi => mi.Instructor)) //New 'trick'
    .OrderByDescending(m => m.ModuleStartDate)
    .Skip(pageSize * (p - 1))
    .Take(pageSize);

  foreach (var m in modules)
  {
    m.Instructor = new List<Instructor>();
    foreach (var mi in m.ModuleInstructor)
    {
      //Adds from the ModuleInstructor instead of pairing from another list
      m.Instructor.Add(mi.Instructor);
    }
  }

  return View(modules);
}

According to LinqPad it takes only SQL statement and it performs slightly faster that the first method.

To be perfectly honest, I have trouble picturing exactly how this works and why, but it does. I am very happy that I stuck with the problem, coming back to it several times more until I got it "just right."

My one question: is this the best way to do this or is there a still better way?

Clarification: I am not able to change my database tables and am not interested in changing my classes. I am asking if there is a better way to do this operation with the data structure as it is. There doesn't seem to be an answer to this particular situation on StackOverflow and I'm trying to get on here. The question includes all my attempts and if I don't receive a response I am going to answer with my own final solution.

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2  
The easiest way to achieve what you want is to actually drop the ModuleInstructor "class", which really isn't a class. Its a table. How are you mapping your classes to the tables? Code First Fluent API? –  Aron Feb 7 '13 at 1:53
    
Model-first. I just clarified that. Actually, that makes a lot of sense but I guess I didn't realize I could just change the classes to that extent. –  Ryan Clarke Feb 7 '13 at 8:27
    
I am not entirely sure that the Assignments class is a natural property of ModuleInstructor. You could just as easily put Assignments as a property of Module, and then put a Instructor (or even IEnumerable<Instructors>) property on Assignment. –  Aron Feb 8 '13 at 6:43
    
So is there no way to do this without the foreach without changing my classes? –  Ryan Clarke Feb 8 '13 at 11:12
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1 Answer

I think http://stackoverflow.com/a/7966436/596146 is more what you're looking for. I've not used Entity Framework before (only Fluent NHibernate) but I think that Module should have an ICollection<Instructor> rather than an ICollection<ModuleInstructor> and then you tell EF about the assocation table.

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