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Folks, I am new to TypeScript, so be gentle :)

In the default TypeScript HTML app from visual studio, I added

HTMLElement 

to the first line of the window.onload evcent handler, thinking that I could provide a type for "el".

thus:

class Greeter {
    element: HTMLElement;
    span: HTMLElement;
    timerToken: number;

    constructor (element: HTMLElement) { 
        this.element = element;
        this.element.innerText += "The time is: ";
        this.span = document.createElement('span');
        this.element.appendChild(this.span);
        this.span.innerText = new Date().toUTCString();
    }

    start() {
        this.timerToken = setInterval(() => this.span.innerText = new Date().toUTCString(), 500);
    }

    stop() {
        clearTimeout(this.timerToken);
    }

}

window.onload = () => {
    HTMLElement el = document.getElementById('content');
    var greeter = new Greeter(el);
    greeter.start();
};

I get an error

Compile Error. See error list for details .../app.ts (25,17): Expected ';'

Any clue why? I suspect I am missing something obvious.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The types come after the names in TypeScript because the types are optional.

In this case, you don't need to specify the type because it will be inferred from the return value of getElementById...

var el = document.getElementById('content');

In the above line of code, el is statically typed to HTMLElement.

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1  
Thanks. I do like adding the type even if it can be inferred though! I am glad both are supported. –  bnieland Feb 7 '13 at 3:48

Okay: weird syntax!

var el: HTMLElement = document.getElementById('content');

fixes the problem. I wonder why the example didn't do this in the first place?

complete code:

class Greeter {
    element: HTMLElement;
    span: HTMLElement;
    timerToken: number;

    constructor (element: HTMLElement) { 
        this.element = element;
        this.element.innerText += "The time is: ";
        this.span = document.createElement('span');
        this.element.appendChild(this.span);
        this.span.innerText = new Date().toUTCString();
    }

    start() {
        this.timerToken = setInterval(() => this.span.innerText = new Date().toUTCString(), 500);
    }

    stop() {
        clearTimeout(this.timerToken);
    }

}

window.onload = () => {
    var el: HTMLElement = document.getElementById('content');
    var greeter = new Greeter(el);
    greeter.start();
};
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