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I'm working on a system for saving and recalling screen states, this is my first time messing with this kind of stuff so I'm not really sure what the best way to go about this is but I currently store all the "PreviewMonitor" objects (about 40 or so) inside of an array list. The problem is that when I create a copy of the ArrayList titled "allPreviewMonitors" to be stored I end up with an ArrayList with elements that are constantly changing as they original elements are updated. It's almost as if I'm working with the original ArrayList when in fact, it should be an entirely different ArrayList with a 'frozen' version of the elements and their states when I created the copy of allPreviewMonitors. Why is this behavior happening? If need be I can show code, but I'm not sure it's needed here.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are only copying object references into your ArrayList. You need to copy the objects themselves.

In Java, all object variables are actually reference variables. So the code:

Myclass myObject = new Myclass();
Myclass otherObject = myObject;

creates a Myclass object and stores a reference to that Myclass object in the reference variable myObject. It then creates a new reference variable otherObject and the reference data (eg a memory address) is copied from myObject to otherObject. These now refer to the same object in memory. At this point, the line

myObject.myMethod();

has the same results as

otherObject.myMethod();

What you are getting in your ArrayList are different references to the same objects. What you want is one of the following:

Myclass otherObject = myObject.clone(); // use the clone function
// OR
Myclass otherObject = new Myclass(myObject); // use a copy constructor

If you put your objects into the ArrayList using clone() or a copy constructor, your ArrayList will contain references to identical copies, rather than references to the same copies.

As others have pointed out, just making copies of the references is called a 'shallow copy', while making copies of the objects that are referred to is called a 'deep copy'

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1  
I've tried using a copy constructor, however, this resulted in the same output. Could it be because the PreviewMonitor (my object) contains a JButton object, which is what I'm pulling the object from using PreviewMonitor.getJButton()? –  Matthew Salsamendi Feb 8 '13 at 4:30

An Arraylist like all Collections, contains only references to objects. it is not enough to copy the List, you also must clone() the elements (or create new ones, or use a copy constructor) in the list while creating the copy of the List.

This is called making a "Deep Copy", while you currently have a "Shallow Copy".

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How exactly do I go about "cloning" the PreviewMonitor objects. I thought that might be the issue so I created something to test that and created a "clone" method in the PreviewMonitor object as I thought it should be created, but I'm not quite sure if I did it right. public PreviewMonitor clone() { return this; } –  Matthew Salsamendi Feb 7 '13 at 2:53

You need to ensure you do a "deep copy" — that is, clone the PreviewMonitor object. By default, you'll just be doing a shallow copy and duplicating the reference to the same object.

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How exactly do I go about "cloning" the PreviewMonitor objects. I thought that might be the issue so I created something to test that and created a "clone" method in the PreviewMonitor object as I thought it should be created, but I'm not quite sure if I did it right. public PreviewMonitor clone() { return this; } –  Matthew Salsamendi Feb 7 '13 at 2:48
    
I assume PreviewMonitor is one of your own objects. The clone process depends on the object. You'd usually call the clone() method. There's more info at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clone_(Java_method). –  Andrew Feb 7 '13 at 6:15

To clone, you can't just return the current object. You have to create a new object with the same values as the current object. In other words, use the constructor of the current object's Class and create a new object. Make sure the attributes match up between the old object and the new object. Return the new object and repeat for every object in the original list.

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I have tried both'code' for (PreviewMonitor sourcePreviewMonitor : previewMonitors) { this.previewMonitors.add(new PreviewMonitor(sourcePreviewMonitor.getPos(), sourcePreviewMonitor.getJButton().getX(), sourcePreviewMonitor.getJButton() .getY(), sourcePreviewMonitor.getJButton().getWidth(), sourcePreviewMonitor.getJButton().getHeight(), sourcePreviewMonitor.getColumn(), sourcePreviewMonitor.getRow(), sourcePreviewMonitor.getRight())); } -- AND creating a new constructor for the PreviewMonitor object making it take a single argument, another PreviewMonitor and passing that in. –  Matthew Salsamendi Feb 7 '13 at 4:29

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